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Month: October 2018

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

Don’t watch golf like a fan and expect to play on the PGA Tour

College Golf Camps

“Play with FCT vs PAT”

If you want to play golf in college or on the PGA, do not watch the next golf tournament like a fan. Watch it like you’re going to hit the next shot or make the next putt.

With the data you have, think like the player you’re watching. What’s my distance, where is the wind, where is the pin, etc. Play with Focus, Calmness and Toughness. Avoid the P.A.T. as we call it, which is Pressure, Anxiety and Tension.

Playing P.A.T. is sure fire way to rob yourself of your potential. When you learn to play with F.C.T., Focus, Calmness, Toughness, the game gets a whole lot easier because you’re learning how to compete with confidence and letting your body deal with stress.

So ask yourself, “do I play with FCT or PAT?”

It’s so important yet so few understand.  I’m tellin you right now, this stuff works.

In my opinion, one of the greatest training tools is visualization. If you can’t see the shot, you won’t hit the shot. If you can see the shot, assuming you’re playing with FCT, you give yourself the best chance at executing on the shot. And then most importantly, you have to accept the result and move on.

Golf is about concentrating for 4-5 seconds at a time, right? Walking to your next shot, selecting your shot/club, pre-shot routine, concentrate for 4-5 seconds, swing and repeat multiple times throughout a round.

As parents, we all want what is best for our kids. He or She might be the next Tiger Woods, Anika Sorenstam or whatever. Regardless, keep it in perspective. We’re trying to develop confidence. You can’t be great without confidence.

So is your junior golfer growing and getting better? If the answer is YES, then great keep it up. If the answer is NO or I don’t know, maybe change the narrative to play golf with Focus, Calmness and Toughness and watch the confidence grow.

Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Thanks for taking the time to read yet another grammatically error-filled message. Kids, pay attention in English 101……..

You may text me more questions at 469-759-7765
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Don’t watch golf like a fan and expect to play on the PGA Tour

College Golf Camps

“Play with FCT vs PAT”

If you want to play golf in college or on the PGA, do not watch the next golf tournament like a fan. Watch it like you’re going to hit the next shot or make the next putt.

With the data you have, think like the player you’re watching. What’s my distance, where is the wind, where is the pin, etc. Play with Focus, Calmness and Toughness. Avoid the P.A.T. as we call it, which is Pressure, Anxiety and Tension.

Playing P.A.T. is sure fire way to rob yourself of your potential. When you learn to play with F.C.T., Focus, Calmness, Toughness, the game gets a whole lot easier because you’re learning how to compete with confidence and letting your body deal with stress.

So ask yourself, “do I play with FCT or PAT?”

It’s so important yet so few understand.  I’m tellin you right now, this stuff works.

In my opinion, one of the greatest training tools is visualization. If you can’t see the shot, you won’t hit the shot. If you can see the shot, assuming you’re playing with FCT, you give yourself the best chance at executing on the shot. And then most importantly, you have to accept the result and move on.

Golf is about concentrating for 4-5 seconds at a time, right? Walking to your next shot, selecting your shot/club, pre-shot routine, concentrate for 4-5 seconds, swing and repeat multiple times throughout a round.

As parents, we all want what is best for our kids. He or She might be the next Tiger Woods, Anika Sorenstam or whatever. Regardless, keep it in perspective. We’re trying to develop confidence. You can’t be great without confidence.

So is your junior golfer growing and getting better? If the answer is YES, then great keep it up. If the answer is NO or I don’t know, maybe change the narrative to play golf with Focus, Calmness and Toughness and watch the confidence grow.

Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Thanks for taking the time to read yet another grammatically error-filled message. Kids, pay attention in English 101……..

You may text me more questions at 469-759-7765
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Crossed off the Recruiting List and you didn’t even know it…….

 

College Golf Camps

“You were crossed off and you didn’t even know it”
Over the past 6 years, we have listened to hundreds of College Golf Coaches talk about junior golf. We have heard dozens and dozens of examples of horrible stories you would never believe.
For example, a coach once described a day they crossed a recruit “off the list”. The short-story goes something like this. Coach shows up to a tournament. Coach pulls in the parking lot and happens to park a couple cars down from this potential recruit. Coach gets out of the car, the junior golfer and the parents are at the trunk getting clubs out. Parent politely gives the junior golfer a “red” Gatorade for the round. Junior golfer immediately barks back at the parent and says “mom, I said blue Gatorade not red, now get me a blue one.”
The coach got back in the car and drove away. The coach heard how the junior golfer treated the parents. The junior golfer didn’t know and neither did the parents that the coach heard. The coach crossed the potential recruit off the list, never again contacted the recruit.
The point is this, the recruit was crossed off the list and they didn’t even know it. Why? Because of how they treated their parents. Coaches have routinely said, “eventually they will probably treat us like they treat their parents.” Meaning, once you’re at their school and become comfortable, you’re likely to have the same attitude problem.
Moral of the story is simple, don’t get crossed off the list because you never know who might be watching or listening. And thank your parents for the time, money and energy they invest into you and your dream of playing college golf.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Thanks for taking the time to read this simple message and I apologize for any grammatical errors.  Should have paid more attention in English 101……..
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Crossed off the Recruiting List and you didn’t even know it…….

 

College Golf Camps

“You were crossed off and you didn’t even know it”
Over the past 6 years, we have listened to hundreds of College Golf Coaches talk about junior golf. We have heard dozens and dozens of examples of horrible stories you would never believe.
For example, a coach once described a day they crossed a recruit “off the list”. The short-story goes something like this. Coach shows up to a tournament. Coach pulls in the parking lot and happens to park a couple cars down from this potential recruit. Coach gets out of the car, the junior golfer and the parents are at the trunk getting clubs out. Parent politely gives the junior golfer a “red” Gatorade for the round. Junior golfer immediately barks back at the parent and says “mom, I said blue Gatorade not red, now get me a blue one.”
The coach got back in the car and drove away. The coach heard how the junior golfer treated the parents. The junior golfer didn’t know and neither did the parents that the coach heard. The coach crossed the potential recruit off the list, never again contacted the recruit.
The point is this, the recruit was crossed off the list and they didn’t even know it. Why? Because of how they treated their parents. Coaches have routinely said, “eventually they will probably treat us like they treat their parents.” Meaning, once you’re at their school and become comfortable, you’re likely to have the same attitude problem.
Moral of the story is simple, don’t get crossed off the list because you never know who might be watching or listening. And thank your parents for the time, money and energy they invest into you and your dream of playing college golf.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Thanks for taking the time to read this simple message and I apologize for any grammatical errors.  Should have paid more attention in English 101……..
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC
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