Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

College Golf Camps Junior Golf Camp Events:  College Golf Camps provides college golf opportunities for Junior Golfers wanting exposure to College Golf. Location Venues are: Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf –        College Golf Camps.  Golf Resorts and Courses: Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

La Costa Golf Resort, Carlsbad, California

https://www.omnihotels.com/hotels/san-diego-la-costa

Pinehurst

http://www.pinehurst.com/golf/

Dallas

http://www.fourseasons.com/dallas/golf/courses/tpc_four_seasons_las_colinas/

Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

Contact College Golf Camps of America for more information on Three Day National Junior Golf Exposure Camps in Dallas, Texas – San Diego, California and Pinehurst, North Carolina

https://collegegolfcamps.com/juniorgolfcamps/

College Golf Camps  has the resources you need to become a better golfer  College Golf Camps facilitates the best location venues, partners with the most accomplished coaches, and works endlessly with our junior golfers to improve their game.

Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf College Golf Camps

Highlights:

Pinehurst, Texas and California Camp Curriculum includes 21 hours of Education, and 9 hours of competition fun. College Golf Camps places emphasis on instruction, education, practice and competition growth.

College Golf Camps: Event Features

  • Golf Game Development
  • Play Team Golf – Play College Golf
  • Transition Practice to Tournament Preparation for Competition
  • Mental Game Assessment
  • Golf Strategies
  • Golf Tips
  • Course Management
  • Putting Skills
  • Assessments and Evaluations
  • Golf Game Knowledge Development
  • Student Development
  • Preparation How To Transition from Junior to College Golf

Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

Education:

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf

College Golf Camps

Meet College Golf Coaches in

Dallas, San Diego, or Pinehurst for College Golf Camps Junior Golf

Life Skills for entering College Freshman,

Be the Student in Student-Athlete,

Transition from High School to College,

Swing Tips,

Course Management and Tips including How To Manage Your Way Around the Golf Course.

Golf Drills,

Evaluations for Game Development and Educational Purposes

Success for Student-Athletes

Competition: College Coaches  provide interaction, education and Evaluations

Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf College Golf Camps Venues

36 holes of golf competition

9 hole short game challenge with College Golf Coaches

Players will be provided feedback on golf game improvement

Student Preparation:

NCAA Education

Road Map for Junior Golf,

Team Golf,

Championship Golf,

Question and Answers Sessions

Educational Seminars with College Golf Coaches at the

Pinehurst-Texas-California Junior Golf

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf College Golf Camps

Playing with Freedom,

Harness your Inner Champion

Improve overall Skills and Golf Knowledge

Trackman Skills Assessment – 15 shots

Optional TrackMan Combine

Video Analysis

TPI Evaluation

Titleist Performance Institute Golf Assessment  60 minutes assessment involving a 13 point physical evaluation to address physical capabilities and relate them to golf swing.  A personalized strength and flexibility program to address your needs is also a portion of  TPI Evaluation

Titleist Performance Institute Golf Assessment

 

Dallas-San Diego-Pinehurst Junior Golf

Sign up for the Dallas, San Diego, Or Pinehurst Junior Golf Camp Events

College Golf Camps provides unique college golf opportunities designed specifically for Junior Golfers wanting exposure to College Golf. Location Venues are: Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf College Golf Camps

Junior Golf Instruction in Dallas, San Diego & Pinehurst

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf

Contact College Golf Camps of America today to learn of the Three Day National Junior Golf Exposure Camp in Dallas, Texas for 2017. Or sign up for the San Diego, California and Pinehurst North Carolina – College Golf Camps today! At CGC, we have all the resources you need to become a better golfer, we work with the best venues, partner with the best coaches and work tediously along our junior golfers to improve their game.

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf College Golf Camps

Highlights:

Each Exposure Camp Curriculum includes 21 hours of Education and 9 hours of competition fun! With emphasis on instruction, education, practice and competition growth.

College Golf Camps: Event Features

  • Golf Game Development:  Play Team Golf – Play College Golf
  • Transition Practice to Tournament Preparation for Competition
  • Mental Game Assessment for Golf Strategies and Tips
  • Course Management
  • Putting Skills Assessment
  • Golf Game Knowledge Development
  • Student Development and Preparation How To Transition from Junior to College Golf

Education: Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf

College Golf Camps

Meet College Golf Coaches in

Dallas, San Diego, or Pinehurst for College Golf Camps Junior Golf

Life Skills for entering College Freshman,

Be the Student in Student-Athlete,

Transition from High School to College

Swing Tips,

Course Management and Tips including How To Manage Your Way Around the Golf Course

Golf Drills,

Evaluations for Game Development and Educational Purposes

Success for Student-Athletes

Competition: College Coaches  provide interaction, education and Evaluations

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf College Golf Camps Venues

36 holes of golf competition

9 hole short game challenge with College Golf Coaches

Players will be provided feedback on golf game improvement

Student Preparation:

NCAA Education

Road Map for Junior Golf,

Team Golf,

Championship Golf,

Question and Answers Sessions

Educational Seminars with College Golf Coaches at the

Dallas, San Diego, Pinehurst Junior Golf College Golf Camps

Playing with Freedom,

Harness your Inner Champion

Improve overall Skills and Golf Knowledge

Trackman Skills Assessment – 15 shots

Optional TrackMan Combine

Video Analysis

TPI Evaluation

Titleist Performance Institute Golf Assessment  60 minutes assessment involving a 13 point physical evaluation to address physical capabilities and relate them to golf swing.  A personalized strength and flexibility program to address your needs is also a portion of  TPI Evaluation               Titleist Performance Institute Golf Assessment

What makes a good putter good? Golf Science Lab

Podcast, Season 4, Swing

What makes a good putter good? w/ Dr Rob Neal

We’ve all heard a lot of tips and tricks about putting, but what actually makes a good putter good. Today we talk with leading biomechanist Dr Rob Neal as he shares his research and experience working with the best players and putting coaches in the world.

What makes a good putter?

The key to being a successful putter is to deliver the putter head with the right energy at impact and the club face pointing in the right direction and do that consistently well.

You cannot on one stroke be perfect and on the next, nowhere near the mark. What you will see with expertise in putting is really high levels of consistency with putter head delivery.

If you measure them on a SAM or a GBD system you will find that the standard deviations of face angles, dynamic loft, etc are approximately 0.3 of a degree. That is very low and that might be over 10 or 15 putting strokes. The levels of variability or the standard deviations as you move proximally at expert players, increases a little bit and this is their mechanism of coordinating the stroke.

Good putters are also able to coordinate their movement and compensate if need be.

Good putters are also able to coordinate their movement and compensate if need be. If they pull a little bit too hard with the lead arm they can compensate by doing something different with the forearm and the hand in order to deliver the club or the putter, with the precision necessary to make the putt. If you didn’t have this subtle coordination amongst the body segments involved in a stroke, then if one part of the body made an error on the stroke, then that would be it. It will be all over.

All of the putting coaches that Dr Rob Neal works with (David Orr, Paul Hurrion and Phil Kenyon) strongly argue that this coordination of the body segments is one of the things that separate the good putter from the really good putters.

Really good putters have the ability to compensate or modify what they are doing within the stroke in order to produce the right outcome in the putter head.

Evaluating putting

The process that I would typically go through is examine what someone does with the putter first. What the stroke mechanics look like,face angle, dynamic loft, putter path, rise angle, etc and then work my way from the putter back to what the body was doing in order to produce that particular pattern of movement.

The process that I would typically go through is examine what someone does with the putter first.

The challenge then is to find good elements in anyone’s putting stroke and then be able to modify those things and maybe disruptive in their technique and really make a difference for them putting reasonably well, and putting poorly.

There is no one solution that we would dictate is right for everyone because it’s to change a motor pattern, so we are looking for things that have the maximum impact with the minimum change.

Sometimes, that might be changing the putter or changing the loft and lie on the putter. If the stroke itself is really consistent but there is too much dynamic loft, at impact then the simple solution would be to change the loft on the putter, reduce it by a couple of degrees or if there is not enough dynamic loft at impact, then maybe the ball needs to be put further forward in the stance so that you could make the same stroke but catch it at a different point during the arc that the putter is making.

I can tell you as opposed to what some people think, “try to keep the hands out of your putting stroke”, every person we have measured has hand action during their stroke. So it’s not like you can get rid of it, in fact, it’s probably a good thing to have in there.

About our guest

Dr Rob Neal

Dr. Robert NealDr Robert Neal, CEO, established golf biodynamics (GBD) in 2000 with the intention of providing the best possible biomechanics service available to golfers and teaching professionals alike. A unique skill set has made this a reality.

Today, the GBD philosophy towards performance enhancement has not changed, we are proponents of an integrated approach to supporting “the golf athlete”. That is, we combine a scientific approach with the practical skills necessary to bring about technical change, all of which is performed in conjunction with the teaching professional and athlete’s own support network (which may include the athletic development specialist, physical therapist, podiatrist, nutritionist etc).

The diverse nature of our clientele reflects the extensive skill set that rob and others in our GBD team bring to the table. While GBD regularly works with golfers of all playing abilities (playing professionals and recreational golfers) we also consult to teaching professionals and organizations such as the Jim McLean golf schools, the Titleist Performances Institute (TPI), the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), various PGA’s worldwide (Australia, New Zealand, US, UK, Denmark, Germany, Sweden, and Switzerland), The Danish Golf Union, The German National Team and more.

Links / Resources

Golf Biodynamics

Junior Golf Magazine – College Golf Camps

Junior Golf Magazine Has a Special Gift for You

College Golf Camps Junior Golf Magazine

Get a 3 Issue Subscription of Junior Golf Magazine – No Cost

Kids, junior golfers – student athletes are the future of the game of golf. Nobody knows that better than Junior Golf Magazine. Issues are filled with all types of great articles about and for junior golfers – student athletes. Right now, you can get 3 No Cost Digital Issues.To receive this special gift click here:

Eight issues per year are published and each has new stories, and play junior golf tips. Start receiving your 3 No Cost Digital Issues right away. Reserve your free subscriptions online!

SPECIAL BONUS SNEAK PREVIEW: View the December Junior Golf Magazine, Flipbook, enjoy our December issue to know what everyone has been talking about!

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Address: PO Box 8376 Jupiter, FL 33468
Email: rich@juniorgolfmag.net
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College Golf Camps Upcoming Schedule

  • Princeton – San Diego – Pinehurst – Dallas
  • TPC Las Colinas -La Costa Golf Resort -Pinehurst
  • Attending Coaches: ACC, PAC 12, SEC, BIG 10, BIG 12

College Golf Camps Mission:

Our mission is to provide the highest quality experience, while incorporating more than typical junior golf student athlete experiences. At College Golf Camps we focus on teaching and educating all aspects of the junior golf competition. Our College Golf Camps are purposed to educate parents, and student athletes, as well as prepare golfers for College Golf.

At College Golf Camps Events, please expect  first-class experiences including advanced golf offerings, as well as competition, while preserving the importance of having fun during the entire process, and events. Register for College Golf Camps Events to experience golf instruction like never before.

Call today to get your questions answered 844-884-1551 or Email us at info@collegegolfcamps.com

 

University Central Florida Golf Event | Emily Marron

University of Central Florida Golf: Emily Marron

Junior Golf Exposure Camp in Florida

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

College Golf Camps with Emily Marron

University Central Florida Head Golf Coach Putting Drills

Additional College Golf information about Head Golf Coach Emily Marron in UCF Today – University Central Florida.

College Golf Camp University Central Florida Emily Marron Junior Golf Exposure Camp Highlights

  • Junior Golf
  • Development Workshop
  • Play College Golf
  • Junior Golf Practice
  • Full Swing Instruction
  • Putting Skills
  • Green Reading
  • Golf Rules
  • Course Management
  • 18 Hole Competition
  • Written Evaluation

 

University Central Florida Emily Marron Junior Golf Exposure Camp

Camp Schedule

7:45am Camp Check in Twin Rivers Golf Club
8:00am Putting Green – drills, instruction, green reading, junior golf camp skills
9:00am Short Game – drills, instruction, skills development
11:30am Lunch with Coaches – Parents welcome, lunch is not included
12:30pm 18 hole competition, coaches on the golf course with the junior golf campers, course management, how to approach , shot selection, play college golf strategies
5:00pm Post camp round feedback, discussions, written evaluations
5:30pm Conclusion of University Central Florida Emily Marron Junior Golf Exposure Camp

University Central Florida Emily Marron’s Junior Golf Exposure Camp Event is structured to teach golfers to think outside the box. University Central Florida head coach Emily Marron, wants to provide the highest values for the junior golfer student athlete and family. College Golf Camps topics have included: “Transition from High School to Play College Golf”, “Life Skills for the College Freshman”,  “A Golfers Mind”,  and “Heart of a Champion”.

NCAA Division II – Rule Changes

NCAA Division II Rule Changes

This week, we’ll look at rule changes approved by Division II member schools at the recent NCAA Convention. While Division II approved all 18 proposals that were up for a vote, we’ll just highlight the ones that may have a significant impact directly on student-athletes, including financial aid changes that don’t take effect until August of 2018 – NCAA Division II Rule Changes

Among those approved proposals that are effective immediately:  NCAA Division II Rule Changes

An athlete who competes in outside competition (not representing their college team) may receive actual and necessary expense money for competition (and practice for that competition) from sponsors such as neighbors or hometown businesses, but not from agents, university boosters, or pro teams.

An athlete can tryout for a pro sports team provided the athlete doesn’t miss class (rules on other aspects of a tryout still apply)

A Division II coach/department is not required to obtain permission from an NAIA college prior to discussing a transfer with an NAIA athlete, but is required to notify the NAIA college before the discussion takes place.

Effective summer 2017 (after conclusion of Division II sport season):  NCAA Division II Rule Changes

Athletes in individual sports such as track and field may accept prize money in an open event (not to exceed actual and necessary expenses for that event) during the summer vacation period after the conclusion of their college season

Proposals that take effect August 1, 2017:  NCAA Division II Rule Changes

Division II schools will be required to establish structure in which team doctors and athletic trainers have “unchallengable authority” to determine injury treatment and “return to play” decisions. Schools must also designate an athletics health care administrator to oversee health care delivery and management.

Revises guidelines under which an athlete can be granted a medical hardship waiver. To qualify starting next Fall, an athlete must not participate in competition after the mid-point of the season and must appear in not more than 3 contests or 30 percent of the playing season, an increase from 2 contests or 20 percent.

Proposals taking effect August 1, 2018:  NCAA Division II Rule Changes

Only athletic scholarships will count against team scholarship limitations. Academic and need-based financial aid will be exempt from such calculations.

Division II athletic programs will be restricted from awarding scholarships for only one semester except in limited situations (such as when an athlete only needs one semester to graduate and/or complete their playing eligibility).

An athlete’s scholarship may be increased at any time for any reason when such funds are available (team and individual limits will still apply).

When you have questions about how you or your athlete may be impacted by these changes in Division II rules, you’re welcome to contact us at 913-766-1235 or at rick@informedathlete.com

http://informedathlete.com/

Informed Athlete In the News

NCAA Division II Rule Changes

NCAA Division II

NCAA Division II

Golf Camps Spring Summer Junior Golf

Golf Camps:  Junior Golf Exposure Camps are where campers can learn, compete, showcase, interact and gain exposure to College Golf Coaches.

Junior College Golf Camps Calendar                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     College Golf Camps – Junior Golf Camps – College Coaches – Junior Golf Instruction

Featured Camps: Princeton

Ivy League Junior Golf Exposure Camp hosted by Princeton 2017

San Diego

Three Day National Junior Golf Exposure Camps – San Diego, California 2017

Pinehurst

Three Day National Junior Golf Exposure Camps – Pinehurst, North Carolina 2017

Dallas

Three Day National Junior Golf Exposure Camps – Dallas, Texas 2017

We’re taking over the best courses:

TPC Las Colinas -La Costa Golf Resort -Pinehurst

College Golf Coaches Attending:

ACC, PAC 12, SEC, BIG 10, BIG 12

 

 

University of Tulsa Emilee Klein Junior Golf Camp

University of Tulsa – Emilee Klein –

Junior Golf Exposure Camp

  • College Golf Practice
  • Full Swing Instruction
  • Putting Skills and Green Reading, Drills and Instruction
  • Short Game Skills Development
  • Rules
  • Course Management
  • 18 Hole Competition
  • Written Evaluation from Coaches

Camp Schedule

7:45am Camp Check in at golf course
8:00am Putting Green – drills, instruction, green reading, skill development
9:00am Short Game – drills, instruction, skill development
11:30am Lunch with Coaches (Parents welcome, lunch is not included)
12:30pm 18 hole competition, coaches on the  golf course with junior golf campers,

reviewing  golf holes, how to approach , shot selection, and course management

5:00pm Post camp/round feedback, discussions, written evaluations
5:30pm Conclusion of Camp

Emilee Klein-Gille
Head Coach, University of Tulsa

http://www.tulsahurricane.com/coaches.aspx?rc=85

All-American at Arizona State University

Competed in over 300 events during an eleven year LPGA Tour Career – 1995-2005

Number of wins by tour
LPGA Tour 3
Ladies European Tour 1

Emilee Klein-Gille had a successful amateur career winning several tournaments including

the 1991 U.S. Girls’ Junior.

Coach Klein won the 1994 NCAA Division I Championship and competed on

winning teams in 1993 and 1994.  Coach Klein was a member of the

U.S. Curtis Cup team in 1994 and 2002 Solheim Cup team.

Professional wins

LPGA Tour – 3

Aug 11, 1996 PING/Welch’s Championship (Boston)
Aug 18, 1996 Weetabix Women’s British Open
Jul 15, 2001 Michelob Light Classic

College Golf Camps provides Golf Camps for Junior Golf  Student Athletes ages 10-18.

Watch College Golf Camps Junior Golf College Coaches Instruction Video:

https://youtu.be/Y5ZF9-4hE2w

Junior Golf Exposure Camps are where campers can learn, compete,

showcase, interact and gain exposure to College Golf Coaches.

Upcoming Junior Golf Exposure Camps for Spring and Summer

Event Schedule:

https://collegegolfcamps.com/juniorgolfcamps/

FSU Trey Jones Junior Golf Camp

Florida State University – Trey Jones – Junior Golf Exposure College Camp

 

Must Watch Video for Junior Golf Parents

Must Watch Video ofr Junior Golf Parents

Advice for Parents of Junior Golfers

advice for parents of junior golfers

During the week of October 17th, the Golf Channel hosted Junior Golf Week and they conducted an interview with Jon Gordon which really caught my attention. I wanted to share the clip along with a few of my own thoughts in regards to what he is referencing. Here is the LINK to that clip so check it out first.

I am sure each of you got something different from what he talked about. But hopefully, it resonated a little with how you see your son or daughter’s junior golf experience. Here are my two favorite quotes mentioned, these answered questions I get asked a lot and served as great advice for parents of junior golfers involving competitive junior golfing, parenting, and the recruiting process.

“You can’t drive anyone else’s bus, you have to encourage and inspire them to drive their own bus”

I know it’s tough to want the best for your junior golfer and knowing the impact that playing golf can have on their future. But as Jon mentioned, “you can’t drive anyone else’s bus”. Yes, there are going to be times that your son or daughter will not want to be at the golf course. Or even a bad round is going to make them think about quitting, but outside of those occasional moments, the enjoyment of the game and the love for competition ultimately has to come from the player. There is definitely a thin line between pushing a little because you have their best interest in mind and you want to instill a good work ethic in them, and going too far with forcing them to do something they really don’t enjoy doing.

Playing a sport is certainly a great way to enforce important values and character traits. I am 100% behind that little push it may take to encourage and keep them motivated, even when they may want to give up, or they may not be working as hard as they should. Just always try to ask yourself if you are doing if for them or with them? Are you driving the bus or are you a passenger?

“Invest in the root and you will have a great supply of fruit” 

This is another quote that really stood out to me about a topic that I absolutely love to read and learn more about – focusing on the process, not the outcome. So much these days is written and studied about the benefit of being internally motivated and not necessarily goal driven, at least in the sense of being outcome goal-driven.

I consult and advise a lot of players who come to me because their goal is to play college golf, many times with a specific goal of Division I golf or a school that is their top choice or a particular level of academics. While that long term goal is important to consider, when I talk to the player and spend time with them I am trying to figure out why that is their goal, what are they willing to do to achieve it and most importantly, how excited are they about the process that it takes to achieve that goal. Being excited about the goal itself means very little to me, what I want to see is their excitement to play tournament golf, to practice harder, to get better, to work out, to eat right, to compete, to learn new skills, etc… These are the “roots” that Jon refers to in his interview and when you focus on the roots the “great supply of fruit” comes at the chance to play college golf.

 

Brandi Jackson | College Golf RecruitingBrandi Jackson is a College Recruiting Consultant based in Greenville, SC, USA where she advises junior golf families through the college recruiting process. Her website is www.brandijacksongolf.com

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