Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Welcome to college golf camps, please text questions to 469-444-9200

Year: 2014

CGC – Men’s Coach of the Week – Whit Turnbow, Middle Tennesse State

Coach Whit Turnbow continues to be involved with CGC events. He enjoys the process and working with kids.

Where did you play college golf?

Middle Tennessee

What is your greatest achievement?

Raising two children

What is your proudest moment as a coach?
Finishing 15th at the 2008 NCAA National Championship
What trait do dislike the most?

Dishonesty

What trait do admire the most?
Faith
What is your greatest fear?
God
What is your favorite place to eat on the road?
Bonefish
Best advice you received as a junior golfer?
5 P’s—Prior Preparation Prevents Poor Performance
If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
I would be more patient
What is your greatest regret?
Not sharing my faith when opportunities came along
Favorite colors?
Blue/Silver
What is your motto?
1. God 2.Family 3. Education 4. Golf
Talent you most desire in your players?
Passion / Competitiveness

CGC – Men’s Coach of the Week – Whit Turnbow, Middle Tennesse State

Coach Whit Turnbow continues to be involved with CGC events. He enjoys the process and working with kids.

Where did you play college golf?

Middle Tennessee

What is your greatest achievement?

Raising two children

What is your proudest moment as a coach?
Finishing 15th at the 2008 NCAA National Championship
What trait do dislike the most?

Dishonesty

What trait do admire the most?
Faith
What is your greatest fear?
God
What is your favorite place to eat on the road?
Bonefish
Best advice you received as a junior golfer?
5 P’s—Prior Preparation Prevents Poor Performance
If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?
I would be more patient
What is your greatest regret?
Not sharing my faith when opportunities came along
Favorite colors?
Blue/Silver
What is your motto?
1. God 2.Family 3. Education 4. Golf
Talent you most desire in your players?
Passion / Competitiveness

CGC – Women’s Golf Coach of the Week – Kelley Hester, Furman University




Congrats to Coach Kelley Hester!! Coach Kelley has worked several CGC events. Her ability to relate to kids is truly amazing!

Where did you play college golf?

Univ of Georgia

What is your greatest achievement?

As a player, I qualified for 1 U.S. open, 3 U.S. ams, and 2 us girls championships.

What is your proudest moment as a coach?

Stacy Lewis winning her first major, 2011 Kraft Nabisco

What trait do dislike the most?

Dishonesty

What trait do admire the most?

Integrity

What is your greatest fear?

Being late for a tee time…

What is your favorite place to eat on the road?

Panera

Best advice you received as a junior golfer?

Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I’d be taller.

What is your greatest regret?

No regrets!

Favorite colors?

blue

What is your motto?

good, better, best, never let it rest until your goods are better and your betters are the best!

Talent you most desire in your players?

Great putters!

CGC – Women’s Golf Coach of the Week – Kelley Hester, Furman University




Congrats to Coach Kelley Hester!! Coach Kelley has worked several CGC events. Her ability to relate to kids is truly amazing!

Where did you play college golf?

Univ of Georgia

What is your greatest achievement?

As a player, I qualified for 1 U.S. open, 3 U.S. ams, and 2 us girls championships.

What is your proudest moment as a coach?

Stacy Lewis winning her first major, 2011 Kraft Nabisco

What trait do dislike the most?

Dishonesty

What trait do admire the most?

Integrity

What is your greatest fear?

Being late for a tee time…

What is your favorite place to eat on the road?

Panera

Best advice you received as a junior golfer?

Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I’d be taller.

What is your greatest regret?

No regrets!

Favorite colors?

blue

What is your motto?

good, better, best, never let it rest until your goods are better and your betters are the best!

Talent you most desire in your players?

Great putters!

Bill McDonald, South Carolina – Coach of the Week



In our weekly coaches profile, we welcome Coach Bill McDonald from the University of South Carolina. Coach has worked several College Golf Camps events including Dallas ‘13, Dallas ‘14 and Orlando ‘14. He brings high energy and smiles to each camp, not to mention a great 40 yd dash time. We appreciate Coach McDonald working our CGC events and making a great experience for Junior Golfers.

Where did you play college golf?

Georgia Tech

What is your greatest achievement?

1983 Rolex Player of The Year

What is your proudest moment as a coach?

1 shot lead with 3 holes to go at 2013 SEC Championship

What trait do dislike the most?

laziness

What trait do admire the most?

honesty

What is your favorite place to eat on the road?

The best BBQ wherever that may be

Best advice you received as a junior golfer?

learn to hit a go to shot under pressure

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

in golf? probably not getting help sooner for my wrist issues

take a vacation every year

What is your greatest regret?

Not getting my wrist looked at earlier

Favorite colors?

old gold and white

What is your motto?

Dream big and follow through with attention to detail

Bill McDonald, South Carolina – Coach of the Week



In our weekly coaches profile, we welcome Coach Bill McDonald from the University of South Carolina. Coach has worked several College Golf Camps events including Dallas ‘13, Dallas ‘14 and Orlando ‘14. He brings high energy and smiles to each camp, not to mention a great 40 yd dash time. We appreciate Coach McDonald working our CGC events and making a great experience for Junior Golfers.

Where did you play college golf?

Georgia Tech

What is your greatest achievement?

1983 Rolex Player of The Year

What is your proudest moment as a coach?

1 shot lead with 3 holes to go at 2013 SEC Championship

What trait do dislike the most?

laziness

What trait do admire the most?

honesty

What is your favorite place to eat on the road?

The best BBQ wherever that may be

Best advice you received as a junior golfer?

learn to hit a go to shot under pressure

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

in golf? probably not getting help sooner for my wrist issues

take a vacation every year

What is your greatest regret?

Not getting my wrist looked at earlier

Favorite colors?

old gold and white

What is your motto?

Dream big and follow through with attention to detail

Practice with Intention


Practice with Intention

I have always loved to practice and work on my game. I am not the tinkering type, however, I have always genuinely enjoyed hammering away on the Driving Range and hitting balls. I like the rhythm, watching the shot
pattern, and most of all, the constant solid contact in the center of the clubface…I still do. I just don’t hit it as consistently in the center of the clubface anymore. I get to bang balls a few times a year now. Nothing like the
daily grind that I used to do, but I still enjoy my time on the range. It’s my happy place at the Club.

My practice regiment when I was a Junior Golfer was to hit 500 balls a day, 250 chips a day and 500 putts. Then, go play 9 or 18. I think about that now and I was completely nuts!!! My practice regiment changed dramatically when I went to college.

The bottom line is this…you have to PRACTICE WITH INTENTION. Practice is pointless if you don’t have a goal and an objective each day.

College Golf is all about timing. Most college golfers have early morning workouts (hello 6am workouts), class from 8-12ish, then, practice from 2-5ish. This means you don’t have all day to hang out on the course or the
range to improve. You have to create a practice schedule that works with your training schedule, your class schedule, your team schedule and your personal life. That’s a lot to manage.

The key is creating a successful practice program that keeps all aspects of your game sharp. I would recommend hitting about 100-150 balls a day, do your diligence on the pitching and putting greens, but spend your time
on course. The course is less than ideal for working on technique, but it’s the only place you can really challenge yourself and see the results of what your are working on during practice. Let’s be honest, being a range and practice warrior means nothing. You have to be able to take it to the course and make it work.

1996. I was warming up at The Country Club in Brookline, MA, for the US Amateur Finals. It was the biggest stage of my career, and my first three shots of the day were Hosel Rockets. I took a lap around my bag, had a quick chat with myself and started over. It was the best 32 holes of my career. I won 4&3. My point is this, the range ultimately means very little. All of your focus should be on practicing with intention, then, when you get to the course, get out of your own way and play. It’s a tricky thing, but more than worthwhile.

So set some short game goals, set some ball striking goals, and maybe a no 3 putt goal for the day, then, get out of the way and play.

Fairways and Greens,

Kelli

Practice with Intention


Practice with Intention

I have always loved to practice and work on my game. I am not the tinkering type, however, I have always genuinely enjoyed hammering away on the Driving Range and hitting balls. I like the rhythm, watching the shot
pattern, and most of all, the constant solid contact in the center of the clubface…I still do. I just don’t hit it as consistently in the center of the clubface anymore. I get to bang balls a few times a year now. Nothing like the
daily grind that I used to do, but I still enjoy my time on the range. It’s my happy place at the Club.

My practice regiment when I was a Junior Golfer was to hit 500 balls a day, 250 chips a day and 500 putts. Then, go play 9 or 18. I think about that now and I was completely nuts!!! My practice regiment changed dramatically when I went to college.

The bottom line is this…you have to PRACTICE WITH INTENTION. Practice is pointless if you don’t have a goal and an objective each day.

College Golf is all about timing. Most college golfers have early morning workouts (hello 6am workouts), class from 8-12ish, then, practice from 2-5ish. This means you don’t have all day to hang out on the course or the
range to improve. You have to create a practice schedule that works with your training schedule, your class schedule, your team schedule and your personal life. That’s a lot to manage.

The key is creating a successful practice program that keeps all aspects of your game sharp. I would recommend hitting about 100-150 balls a day, do your diligence on the pitching and putting greens, but spend your time
on course. The course is less than ideal for working on technique, but it’s the only place you can really challenge yourself and see the results of what your are working on during practice. Let’s be honest, being a range and practice warrior means nothing. You have to be able to take it to the course and make it work.

1996. I was warming up at The Country Club in Brookline, MA, for the US Amateur Finals. It was the biggest stage of my career, and my first three shots of the day were Hosel Rockets. I took a lap around my bag, had a quick chat with myself and started over. It was the best 32 holes of my career. I won 4&3. My point is this, the range ultimately means very little. All of your focus should be on practicing with intention, then, when you get to the course, get out of your own way and play. It’s a tricky thing, but more than worthwhile.

So set some short game goals, set some ball striking goals, and maybe a no 3 putt goal for the day, then, get out of the way and play.

Fairways and Greens,

Kelli

Extraordinary Experience



What should you expect from College Golf Camps of America?

Come to a College Golf Camp for 3 days of golf skill development and competition. College Golf Camps of America is becoming widely recognized by college coaches as one of the best junior golf camps in the nation.
The camp offers a unique golf experience to junior golfers interested in playing college golf. At camp, junior golfers will develop individual skills, learn what its takes at the next level and experience first hand the college golf formula.

You should expect a extraordinary experience! Different than you have ever experienced. You should expect to learn from and interact with current college golf coaches. That is what every junior golfer and parent wants.
The opportunity to have face-to-face contact with the best coaches in the country and learn what it takes at the next level. Buckle up because College Golf Camps of America will give you what you desire in junior golf. #opportunity

Instruction – Our goal is to provide a new level of instruction from our college golf coaches. There is so much more to instruction in the game of golf then just swing mechanics. Find out directly from college golf coaches how they instruct their teams. Expect more from your instruction.

Development – Our focus is to teach the game and skills needed to play at a higher level. Our seminars is built around a “game time” environment, putting our junior golfers in real situations to help them reach their full potential, find out their limitations and give them an opportunity to think through “the game” on their own.

Competition – We want our junior golfers to have a “fairway” view so they can see what it takes to play the game at a higher level. The opportunity to “raise the bar” and play golf in front of college programs gives our junior golfers the chance to identify what it takes to play at the next level after junior golf.

Exposure – Not only do our players get the opportunity to showcase their “skill-set” in front of college golf coaches, they also get the chance to showcase their instincts, knowledge and feel for the game
while executing and adjusting to “competition” situations. Why do we do this? This gives our college golf coaches the best opportunity to teach in a learning environment. Teachable moments are best taught on the golf course and that is what we subscribe to.

Evaluation – Constant feedback is given to our junior golfers on what are there strengths, weaknesses and future projections. We want to help identify a what the junior golfer does good, what they need to get better at and how are they going to do it. Each junior golfer based on their skills and tools that will allow them the best opportunity to be successful and continue their careers after junior golf. Every junior golfer who attends our camps receive at least 3 written evaluations from our college coaching staff.

Extraordinary Experience



What should you expect from College Golf Camps of America?

Come to a College Golf Camp for 3 days of golf skill development and competition. College Golf Camps of America is becoming widely recognized by college coaches as one of the best junior golf camps in the nation.
The camp offers a unique golf experience to junior golfers interested in playing college golf. At camp, junior golfers will develop individual skills, learn what its takes at the next level and experience first hand the college golf formula.

You should expect a extraordinary experience! Different than you have ever experienced. You should expect to learn from and interact with current college golf coaches. That is what every junior golfer and parent wants.
The opportunity to have face-to-face contact with the best coaches in the country and learn what it takes at the next level. Buckle up because College Golf Camps of America will give you what you desire in junior golf. #opportunity

Instruction – Our goal is to provide a new level of instruction from our college golf coaches. There is so much more to instruction in the game of golf then just swing mechanics. Find out directly from college golf coaches how they instruct their teams. Expect more from your instruction.

Development – Our focus is to teach the game and skills needed to play at a higher level. Our seminars is built around a “game time” environment, putting our junior golfers in real situations to help them reach their full potential, find out their limitations and give them an opportunity to think through “the game” on their own.

Competition – We want our junior golfers to have a “fairway” view so they can see what it takes to play the game at a higher level. The opportunity to “raise the bar” and play golf in front of college programs gives our junior golfers the chance to identify what it takes to play at the next level after junior golf.

Exposure – Not only do our players get the opportunity to showcase their “skill-set” in front of college golf coaches, they also get the chance to showcase their instincts, knowledge and feel for the game
while executing and adjusting to “competition” situations. Why do we do this? This gives our college golf coaches the best opportunity to teach in a learning environment. Teachable moments are best taught on the golf course and that is what we subscribe to.

Evaluation – Constant feedback is given to our junior golfers on what are there strengths, weaknesses and future projections. We want to help identify a what the junior golfer does good, what they need to get better at and how are they going to do it. Each junior golfer based on their skills and tools that will allow them the best opportunity to be successful and continue their careers after junior golf. Every junior golfer who attends our camps receive at least 3 written evaluations from our college coaching staff.

Survey Says!!

Did you have a fun experience at College Golf Camps?

98% say yes

How much has your knowledge of College Golf improved because of the information at the College Golf Camps?

81%say a great deal/a lot

Overall, were you satisfied with the event, neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with it, or dissatisfied with it?

87% say Extremely/Moderately Satisfied

Was the event better than what you expected,worse than what you expected, or about what you expected?

79% say much/somewhat better

How useful to you and your Junior Golfer was the information presented at the event?

89% say Extremely/Very Useful

How much of the interaction with College Coaches was useful?

88% say All of it/Most of it

Would you attend College Golf Camps, if you had to do it all over again?

87% say Definitely/Very likely

How many of the objectives of the event were met?

88% say All of them/Most of them

What was the most valuable aspects of College Golf Camps?

College Coaches, Instruction, Interaction, Access, Information, Knowledge, Learning, Presentations


How organized was the event?

92% say Extremely/Very/Moderately Organized

Based on your experience at CGC would you recommend College Golf Camps of America to a friend?

97% say definitely/possibly

Based on your experience at CGC, are you planning on attending a future College Golf Camps of America event?

77% say Definitely/Possibly

Survey Says!!

Did you have a fun experience at College Golf Camps?

98% say yes

How much has your knowledge of College Golf improved because of the information at the College Golf Camps?

81%say a great deal/a lot

Overall, were you satisfied with the event, neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with it, or dissatisfied with it?

87% say Extremely/Moderately Satisfied

Was the event better than what you expected,worse than what you expected, or about what you expected?

79% say much/somewhat better

How useful to you and your Junior Golfer was the information presented at the event?

89% say Extremely/Very Useful

How much of the interaction with College Coaches was useful?

88% say All of it/Most of it

Would you attend College Golf Camps, if you had to do it all over again?

87% say Definitely/Very likely

How many of the objectives of the event were met?

88% say All of them/Most of them

What was the most valuable aspects of College Golf Camps?

College Coaches, Instruction, Interaction, Access, Information, Knowledge, Learning, Presentations


How organized was the event?

92% say Extremely/Very/Moderately Organized

Based on your experience at CGC would you recommend College Golf Camps of America to a friend?

97% say definitely/possibly

Based on your experience at CGC, are you planning on attending a future College Golf Camps of America event?

77% say Definitely/Possibly

What your Winning Identity?

Dear Golf Coaches,

As many of you know, College Golf Camps has grown significantly over the past two years.

In December of 2012, College Golf Camps was introduced to a gentleman named Joe Shuchat and his team from Winning Identity. Joe and his team was one of the first organizations to believe in our concepts, for that I
am extremely grateful. He and his team have worked tiredlessly to help us improve our processes and overall experience for junior golfers, parents and golf coaches. Without Winning Identity, we would not be
where we are today.

What is Winning Identity? Click here

I would personally like to encourage each of you to visit their website and learn about their extraordinary products. They have been paramount in our growth, I am confident they can help improve your team as well!
We all need help on team organization, time management for your players, improving team communication, goal setting, fitness tracking, drill database, swing analysis software, much more. With Winning Identity you
can manage your players from one spot and stay connected.

Joe and his team have the ability to create a custom package taylored to fit your team needs.

Contact Joe and his team at Winning Identity, his email is joe@winningidentity.com

Sincere thank you to Joe and his winning identity!!

In Golf,

Nick

College Golf Camps of America

What your Winning Identity?

Dear Golf Coaches,

As many of you know, College Golf Camps has grown significantly over the past two years.

In December of 2012, College Golf Camps was introduced to a gentleman named Joe Shuchat and his team from Winning Identity. Joe and his team was one of the first organizations to believe in our concepts, for that I
am extremely grateful. He and his team have worked tiredlessly to help us improve our processes and overall experience for junior golfers, parents and golf coaches. Without Winning Identity, we would not be
where we are today.

What is Winning Identity? Click here

I would personally like to encourage each of you to visit their website and learn about their extraordinary products. They have been paramount in our growth, I am confident they can help improve your team as well!
We all need help on team organization, time management for your players, improving team communication, goal setting, fitness tracking, drill database, swing analysis software, much more. With Winning Identity you
can manage your players from one spot and stay connected.

Joe and his team have the ability to create a custom package taylored to fit your team needs.

Contact Joe and his team at Winning Identity, his email is joe@winningidentity.com

Sincere thank you to Joe and his winning identity!!

In Golf,

Nick

College Golf Camps of America

Kelli’s Korner – Prep work and Winning the US Amateur

Prep Work …Find What Works for You

Prep work is the key to performing your best at big events…it is as
simple as that. The challenging part is learning what works for you as a
player to elevate your game at the right time. Timing is everything…

The stakes are high and most of us are guilty of putting more
pressure on the big events. I did this throughout my junior and
professional career. I always set goals for myself at the beginning of
each year. Then, I would set smaller goals that pertained to my playing
schedule. I would rank my goals in order, and basically gear my entire
season towards my Top 3. It took some time for me to find the right
program, but I found my recipe for success as a junior golfer and
carried that with me throughout my LPGA career.

Preparation was one of the aspects of golf that I loved most when I
was playing. I knew that in order for me to perform my best, I had to
have a plan mapped out for success. I would schedule tune-ups with my
Instructor several weeks prior to the tournament. This always allowed me
the opportunity to fine-tune the hiccups, without being too close to my
big event. I would typically set aside a few hours in the morning to
work on technique, then, spend the afternoon on course.

I still believe that one of the trickiest aspects of golf is how to
adjust what you are working on with your technique, without being too
technical on course, while you are trying to score. That can be a tough
balance. But, you will notice the transition starting to happen and you
soon find the groove you were searching for and your scores start to
reflect your work.

The key to all of this is timing. The most challenging aspect of
peaking at the right time is finding what works for you in order to play
your best. Set your goals, do the work, attempt to enjoy the process,
and look forward to playing some great golf when you are at your next
event.

Winning the US Am’s…

What can I say about winning two US Amateur’s? I remember both wins
vividly…I didn’t realize it at the time…but in hindsight…that was the
best golf of my career during that 2-3 year span.

Let me set the stage…I won the US Junior Girls in 1994. I beat Molly
Cooper in the final match at Meadow Lark Country Club in Great Falls,
Montana. That win inspired me to want to achieve bigger and better
things in golf.

1995…The Country Club in Brookline, MA. That was the site of the US
Amateur. I remember registering for the event and catching a glimpse of
the trophy…it is still to this day the most incredible and beautiful
trophy I have ever seen. Then my Mom told me she had the perfect table
for that trophy to go on in our house…that was all the motivation I
needed.

I remember my first match. It was against Caroline Peek. She was a
bomber and could take advantage of the Par 5’. Here’s the thing: her
power didn’t faze me a bit. Match play is such a mental thing. You have
to keep the momentum steady and never get too high or too low…the second
you loose focus is when you start getting beat. It is imperative to
stay in the moment and focus on the shot at hand. I hit Driver, 5 wood
into the 1st hole. Caroline hit Driver, mid iron. I made par and was 1up after the 1st. I kept chipping away at my matches…one match at a time…and I kept winning.

I remember my match against Kellee Booth. She was one of my biggest
competitor’s during my Junior Career. She was a very talented and well
rounded player. That match went to the 18th. I won it 1up. That’s when I knew I was going to win my first US Amateur.

I played Se Ri Park (now known as Se Ri Pak) in the semi finals. I
beat her 5&4. She paved the way for so many of the Korean players
and was inducted into the LPGA Hall of Fame in 2007 at 30 year’s old.

I remember my warm up for the final match. I always start my warm up
with wedges. Here I am on the biggest stage of my career and my first 3
shots were hosel rockets. My palms started sweating, my heart started
racing and I thought, “holy crap…here I am and I have the shanks.” I did
the only thing I knew to do…I stood further away from the ball and my
“Spanish Fades” disappeared. My final match was against an Australian
player name Anne Marie Knight…I won that match 4&3.

Let’s go to 1996…Firethorn Country Club in Lincoln, Nebraska. I was
the defending Champion. I took one look at “my trophy” and knew I had to
bring it home to go on my Momma’s table. So I did just that. I beat
Marisa Baena in the finals and won 3&2.

Here’s what I remember most about my wins…consistency and the will to
never quit. Let’s face it…everyone is talented when you get to that
level of competition…but the person who wins is the one who stays the
most even keeled and doesn’t get ahead of themselves. The one shot at a
time mentality is a must.

My advice to any young aspiring golfer: work hard, but most
importantly…have fun. Commit yourself to small goals each day and when
you achieve your daily goal…leave for the day and do something away from
the course. Expect that there will be highs and lows…don’t give the
lows too much merit. Focus on the highs and keep building on them…that
will do nothing but help develop and build confidence. Confidence is a
tricky thing…but it is a vital component to successful golf. And like I
mentioned earlier…have fun and enjoy the walk…golf is an incredible
game…don’t ever lose sight that it is in fact just a game.

Fairways and Greens,

Kelli

Kelli’s Korner – Prep work and Winning the US Amateur

Prep Work …Find What Works for You

Prep work is the key to performing your best at big events…it is as
simple as that. The challenging part is learning what works for you as a
player to elevate your game at the right time. Timing is everything…

The stakes are high and most of us are guilty of putting more
pressure on the big events. I did this throughout my junior and
professional career. I always set goals for myself at the beginning of
each year. Then, I would set smaller goals that pertained to my playing
schedule. I would rank my goals in order, and basically gear my entire
season towards my Top 3. It took some time for me to find the right
program, but I found my recipe for success as a junior golfer and
carried that with me throughout my LPGA career.

Preparation was one of the aspects of golf that I loved most when I
was playing. I knew that in order for me to perform my best, I had to
have a plan mapped out for success. I would schedule tune-ups with my
Instructor several weeks prior to the tournament. This always allowed me
the opportunity to fine-tune the hiccups, without being too close to my
big event. I would typically set aside a few hours in the morning to
work on technique, then, spend the afternoon on course.

I still believe that one of the trickiest aspects of golf is how to
adjust what you are working on with your technique, without being too
technical on course, while you are trying to score. That can be a tough
balance. But, you will notice the transition starting to happen and you
soon find the groove you were searching for and your scores start to
reflect your work.

The key to all of this is timing. The most challenging aspect of
peaking at the right time is finding what works for you in order to play
your best. Set your goals, do the work, attempt to enjoy the process,
and look forward to playing some great golf when you are at your next
event.

Winning the US Am’s…

What can I say about winning two US Amateur’s? I remember both wins
vividly…I didn’t realize it at the time…but in hindsight…that was the
best golf of my career during that 2-3 year span.

Let me set the stage…I won the US Junior Girls in 1994. I beat Molly
Cooper in the final match at Meadow Lark Country Club in Great Falls,
Montana. That win inspired me to want to achieve bigger and better
things in golf.

1995…The Country Club in Brookline, MA. That was the site of the US
Amateur. I remember registering for the event and catching a glimpse of
the trophy…it is still to this day the most incredible and beautiful
trophy I have ever seen. Then my Mom told me she had the perfect table
for that trophy to go on in our house…that was all the motivation I
needed.

I remember my first match. It was against Caroline Peek. She was a
bomber and could take advantage of the Par 5’. Here’s the thing: her
power didn’t faze me a bit. Match play is such a mental thing. You have
to keep the momentum steady and never get too high or too low…the second
you loose focus is when you start getting beat. It is imperative to
stay in the moment and focus on the shot at hand. I hit Driver, 5 wood
into the 1st hole. Caroline hit Driver, mid iron. I made par and was 1up after the 1st. I kept chipping away at my matches…one match at a time…and I kept winning.

I remember my match against Kellee Booth. She was one of my biggest
competitor’s during my Junior Career. She was a very talented and well
rounded player. That match went to the 18th. I won it 1up. That’s when I knew I was going to win my first US Amateur.

I played Se Ri Park (now known as Se Ri Pak) in the semi finals. I
beat her 5&4. She paved the way for so many of the Korean players
and was inducted into the LPGA Hall of Fame in 2007 at 30 year’s old.

I remember my warm up for the final match. I always start my warm up
with wedges. Here I am on the biggest stage of my career and my first 3
shots were hosel rockets. My palms started sweating, my heart started
racing and I thought, “holy crap…here I am and I have the shanks.” I did
the only thing I knew to do…I stood further away from the ball and my
“Spanish Fades” disappeared. My final match was against an Australian
player name Anne Marie Knight…I won that match 4&3.

Let’s go to 1996…Firethorn Country Club in Lincoln, Nebraska. I was
the defending Champion. I took one look at “my trophy” and knew I had to
bring it home to go on my Momma’s table. So I did just that. I beat
Marisa Baena in the finals and won 3&2.

Here’s what I remember most about my wins…consistency and the will to
never quit. Let’s face it…everyone is talented when you get to that
level of competition…but the person who wins is the one who stays the
most even keeled and doesn’t get ahead of themselves. The one shot at a
time mentality is a must.

My advice to any young aspiring golfer: work hard, but most
importantly…have fun. Commit yourself to small goals each day and when
you achieve your daily goal…leave for the day and do something away from
the course. Expect that there will be highs and lows…don’t give the
lows too much merit. Focus on the highs and keep building on them…that
will do nothing but help develop and build confidence. Confidence is a
tricky thing…but it is a vital component to successful golf. And like I
mentioned earlier…have fun and enjoy the walk…golf is an incredible
game…don’t ever lose sight that it is in fact just a game.

Fairways and Greens,

Kelli

Scroll to top