Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Welcome to college golf camps, please text questions to 469-444-9200

Square strike wedge and C3i wedge differences!

In Golf we already know about square strike and this year the C3i wedge introduced which looks unique and stylish. The Square Strike Wedge was one of the most popular wedges of 2017. Many famous golfers used this square strike and they have really great reviews about that and now this C3i wedge came in to the world of golf it has really gained the attention of many golfers since it was first introduced in Golf Digest

So,

   Below. . .

Let’s see the main differences between them!

 

square strike

Both are different in every aspects it is up to you which you carry in a most better way!

Square strike wedge and C3i wedge differences!

In Golf we already know about square strike and this year the C3i wedge introduced which looks unique and stylish. The Square Strike Wedge was one of the most popular wedges of 2017. Many famous golfers used this square strike and they have really great reviews about that and now this C3i wedge came in to the world of golf it has really gained the attention of many golfers since it was first introduced in Golf Digest

So,

   Below. . .

Let’s see the main differences between them!

 

square strike

Both are different in every aspects it is up to you which you carry in a most better way!

Ladies European Tour 2019 Winner!

 

Improve your tempo

Nelly korda wins her first Ladies European Tour. She shot a 4-under-par 67 in blustery conditions and won the title by eight shots. Ladies European tour was founded in 1978. It is based at Buckinghamshire Golf Club near London in England. Laura Davies is the one who has most titles win. This tournament happens every year and every year there are about 40 players who participate are of different countries internationally but mostly are European.

Improve your tempo with Tempo in Motion similar to Jordan Spieth

If we talk about personal life of Korda so Nelly korda she was born in Bradenton, Florida on July 28, 1988. She is the daughter of the two big name two big players Petr Korda and Regina Rajchrtova. They both are the greatest players of their time even her father is a tennis grand slam champion who won the 1998 Australia Open. While her sister also plays on LPGA Tour so we can say that she belongs to a sports family.

She said “Conditions were tough, but I tried to stay level headed and I tried to keep my head down and make as many birdies as possible,” said the 21-year-old from Bradenton, Florida, whom, together with her sister Jessica, was the joint leading points’ scorer for the United States Solheim Cup team at Gleneagles last weekend.

“It feels greatest to win in Europe she said. Hopefully, I will win one day in Czech.”

Ladies European Tour 2019 Winner!

 

Improve your tempo

Nelly korda wins her first Ladies European Tour. She shot a 4-under-par 67 in blustery conditions and won the title by eight shots. Ladies European tour was founded in 1978. It is based at Buckinghamshire Golf Club near London in England. Laura Davies is the one who has most titles win. This tournament happens every year and every year there are about 40 players who participate are of different countries internationally but mostly are European.

Improve your tempo with Tempo in Motion similar to Jordan Spieth

If we talk about personal life of Korda so Nelly korda she was born in Bradenton, Florida on July 28, 1988. She is the daughter of the two big name two big players Petr Korda and Regina Rajchrtova. They both are the greatest players of their time even her father is a tennis grand slam champion who won the 1998 Australia Open. While her sister also plays on LPGA Tour so we can say that she belongs to a sports family.

She said “Conditions were tough, but I tried to stay level headed and I tried to keep my head down and make as many birdies as possible,” said the 21-year-old from Bradenton, Florida, whom, together with her sister Jessica, was the joint leading points’ scorer for the United States Solheim Cup team at Gleneagles last weekend.

“It feels greatest to win in Europe she said. Hopefully, I will win one day in Czech.”

Four players nominated for 2019 PGA TOUR!

 

Image of nominees

The chosen people for the Jack Nicklaus Award as the PGA Tour Player of the Year are (one after another in order) Brooks Koepka, Matt Kuchar, Rory McIlroy and Xander Schauffele.

(To improve your game join junior golf camps)

The Player of the Year and Rookie of the Year grants are controlled by a part vote, with PGA TOUR individuals who played in at any rate 15 Fed Ex Cup occasions during the 2018-19 season qualified to cast a ballot. The democratic will close on Friday, Sept. 6, at 5 p.m. ET. The victors will be reported sometime in the future.

This is the principal year the PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year will get the lofty Arnold Palmer Award, named to pay tribute to Golf’s Greatest Ambassador. All through his vocation, Mr. Palmer set the standard for character, great sportsmanship and polished methodology both on and off the fairway. The Arnold Palmer Award is a tribute to its namesake’s impact on endless youthful players and a fitting honor for its beneficiaries, who will shape the game and the PGA TOUR for ages to come.

Player of the Year nominees

Brooks Koepka, 29
West Palm Beach, Florida
· Entered 21 events with victories (3) at THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES, PGA Championship and World Golf Championships-FedEx St. Jude Invitational
· Tied for third in the Fed Ex Cup
· Finished fourth in Scoring Average (69.395)
· Recorded a total of nine top-10 finishes among 20 made cuts

Matt Kuchar, 41
St. Simon Island, Georgia
· Entered 22 events with victories (2) at the Mayakoba Golf Classic and Sony Open in Hawaii
· Matt Kuchar Tied for 16th in the FedEx Cup
· Recorded a total of eight top-10 finishes among 20 made cuts

Rory McIlroy, 30
Holywood, Northern Ireland
· Entered 19 events with victories (3) at THE PLAYERS Championship, RBC Canadian Open and TOUR Championship
· Won the Fed Ex Cup
· Led the PGA TOUR in Scoring Average (69.057)
· Recorded a total of 14 top-10 finishes among 17 made cuts

Xander Schauffele, 25
San Diego, California
· Entered 21 events with victories (2) at the World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions and Sentry Tournament of Champions
· Finished second in the Fed Ex Cup
· Recorded a total of six top-10 finishes among 18 made cuts

 

 

Four players nominated for 2019 PGA TOUR!

 

Image of nominees

The chosen people for the Jack Nicklaus Award as the PGA Tour Player of the Year are (one after another in order) Brooks Koepka, Matt Kuchar, Rory McIlroy and Xander Schauffele.

(To improve your game join junior golf camps)

The Player of the Year and Rookie of the Year grants are controlled by a part vote, with PGA TOUR individuals who played in at any rate 15 Fed Ex Cup occasions during the 2018-19 season qualified to cast a ballot. The democratic will close on Friday, Sept. 6, at 5 p.m. ET. The victors will be reported sometime in the future.

This is the principal year the PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year will get the lofty Arnold Palmer Award, named to pay tribute to Golf’s Greatest Ambassador. All through his vocation, Mr. Palmer set the standard for character, great sportsmanship and polished methodology both on and off the fairway. The Arnold Palmer Award is a tribute to its namesake’s impact on endless youthful players and a fitting honor for its beneficiaries, who will shape the game and the PGA TOUR for ages to come.

Player of the Year nominees

Brooks Koepka, 29
West Palm Beach, Florida
· Entered 21 events with victories (3) at THE CJ CUP @ NINE BRIDGES, PGA Championship and World Golf Championships-FedEx St. Jude Invitational
· Tied for third in the Fed Ex Cup
· Finished fourth in Scoring Average (69.395)
· Recorded a total of nine top-10 finishes among 20 made cuts

Matt Kuchar, 41
St. Simon Island, Georgia
· Entered 22 events with victories (2) at the Mayakoba Golf Classic and Sony Open in Hawaii
· Matt Kuchar Tied for 16th in the FedEx Cup
· Recorded a total of eight top-10 finishes among 20 made cuts

Rory McIlroy, 30
Holywood, Northern Ireland
· Entered 19 events with victories (3) at THE PLAYERS Championship, RBC Canadian Open and TOUR Championship
· Won the Fed Ex Cup
· Led the PGA TOUR in Scoring Average (69.057)
· Recorded a total of 14 top-10 finishes among 17 made cuts

Xander Schauffele, 25
San Diego, California
· Entered 21 events with victories (2) at the World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions and Sentry Tournament of Champions
· Finished second in the Fed Ex Cup
· Recorded a total of six top-10 finishes among 18 made cuts

 

 

Brooks Koepka or Rory McIlroy

PGA Tour

PGA Tour is ongoing and currently Brooks Koepka is leading in the leaderboad while Rory Mcllory  is also at the 4th position.  Both are the best players as you know that Brooks Koepka became World Number 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking after winning the 2018 CJ Cup while Rory Mcllory was world number one in the Official World Golf Ranking for 95 weeks. So it is tough to call that who will win this 2019 PGA Tour!

So do participate in this poll give your vote to whom you think can win this PGA Tour so lets predict. . .

Coming Soon
Lets Vote Now!
Lets Vote Now!
Lets Vote Now!

Admission are Open in junior golf camps

Brooks Koepka or Rory McIlroy

PGA Tour

PGA Tour is ongoing and currently Brooks Koepka is leading in the leaderboad while Rory Mcllory  is also at the 4th position.  Both are the best players as you know that Brooks Koepka became World Number 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking after winning the 2018 CJ Cup while Rory Mcllory was world number one in the Official World Golf Ranking for 95 weeks. So it is tough to call that who will win this 2019 PGA Tour!

So do participate in this poll give your vote to whom you think can win this PGA Tour so lets predict. . .

Coming Soon
Lets Vote Now!
Lets Vote Now!
Lets Vote Now!

Admission are Open in junior golf camps

Amy Bond – Florida State University – College Golf Coach of the Day

Where did you play college golf?

Florida State

First coaching position?

Asst coach at Florida State

What is your greatest achievement?

Coaching at my Alma mater

What is your proudest moment as a coach?

Every player I have ever coached has graduated.

What trait do dislike the most?

Dishonesty

What trait do admire the most?

Honesty and great work ethic

What is your greatest fear?

Not a huge fan of the dark. 😉

Best advice you received as a junior golfer?

I can only control me and my attitude on the course.

Biggest misunderstanding of current junior golfers?

That they are very lazy and not willing to work hard.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

No matter what the situation to be more positive.

If you could change one thing about college golf, what would it be?

I would have 27 competition days instead of 24.

What is your greatest regret?

Don’t have one

Favorite colors?

Red

What is your motto?

No One Gets There Alone

Talent you most desire in your players?

Being coachable

Amy Bond – Florida State University – College Golf Coach of the Day

Where did you play college golf?

Florida State

First coaching position?

Asst coach at Florida State

What is your greatest achievement?

Coaching at my Alma mater

What is your proudest moment as a coach?

Every player I have ever coached has graduated.

What trait do dislike the most?

Dishonesty

What trait do admire the most?

Honesty and great work ethic

What is your greatest fear?

Not a huge fan of the dark. 😉

Best advice you received as a junior golfer?

I can only control me and my attitude on the course.

Biggest misunderstanding of current junior golfers?

That they are very lazy and not willing to work hard.

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

No matter what the situation to be more positive.

If you could change one thing about college golf, what would it be?

I would have 27 competition days instead of 24.

What is your greatest regret?

Don’t have one

Favorite colors?

Red

What is your motto?

No One Gets There Alone

Talent you most desire in your players?

Being coachable

Spieth shot ___ in the final round of the 2012 NCAA Championships

“I can’t believe his missed that putt. If he makes that putt, we win.”
No one has ever purposely missed a putt when it counted. We can all agree on that.
Apologies up front, I write how I talk, it’s not the best for writing according to my English 201 professor but whatever, here goes…….
I have spent a lifetime studying teams, individuals on teams, coaches, coaching philosophy, what makes people tick and most importantly, how to get people to rise to the occasion and play above their skill-set in the biggest moments. In my studies, one way or another, all great programs commit to 3 basic aspects.
I have no formal training, except the school of hard-knocks. Watching personalities interact on a team or in a program is extremely interesting. With a mind-set of “look, listen, learn”, I have spent roughly 10,000 hours over the past 20 years with some of the greatest minds in sports performance.
Again, no PHD, no masters, just blessed to be around some phenomenal people who love to think outside the box. 3 simple focal points are consistent.
#1 – Be positive, #2 – Don’t be critical of your teammates or coaches and #3 – have a strong desire to be apart of something bigger than yourself. So easy to say, but so hard for us to do……
Think about it for a second. Simply be positive, like BE POSITIVE. How many parents sit on a sideline or roam the golf course and are just simply positive? NOT MANY is the answer. How many players are positive about their teammates play? Most are critical of everything, like, weather, conditions of the greens, how the tournament is being ran or how a teammate is playing poorly. Like any teammate has ever purposely played poorly to keep his/her team from winning a tournament? So be POSITIVE. Even on the ride home, find only positive things to say. Focus on effort, attitude, response to adversity, etc.
Being critical is human nature. “It’s the coaches fault”, “we would have won if johnny just would have made that putt”, “we don’t practice putting enough”, “johnny shouldn’t the 5th player it should be jerry”……or whatever….do anything but take accountability and responsibility for your own actions. Like the coach doesn’t try to make his team better….Like a player missing a putt on purpose…. you bet, that’s like saying the player fumbled the ball on purpose to keep his team from winning….doesn’t happen, right?
Parents are often the experts on what kid should be playing in what position, only they are not at practice and they do not possess all of the data points for the decision made. Instead, players and parent blame teammates and coaches for everything. Why not defend your coach? Why not defend your teammate? For example, if your mom or dad is chipping on one of your teammates/coaches, why not respond with “Mom, I know you want us to win and so do I. Johnny works exceptionally hard at practice and you criticizing him only creates doubt in my head and makes our team weaker.” Could you imagine the look on the parents face? So defend your coach, defend your teammates, do it respectfully, but do it ALWAYS. One day, you will need them to make a putt or execute on a shot to win a tournament, or a state title. So be loyal to your coach and your teammates.
Any finally, be apart of something bigger than yourself. Playing college golf is a team sport. Most college coaches, if not all care about how you treat your teammates. All great teams accomplish great tasks by truly caring and working together. Sooooo easy to say, but soooooo hard for a lot to do because it might steal the attention off of YOU. For example, the #1 player on the team cares more about winning the tournament individually than winning it as a team. Would you finish 2nd or 3rd in a tournament if it meant your team won the overall tournament?
Think about it, nobody remembers what Jordan Spieth shot in the 2012 NCAA finals. But we all know he and the Texas Longhorns won the championship in dramatic fashion. You can’t win anything alone, some where, somebody has to help you win.
Be positive, don’t be critical of your teammates/coaches and want to be apart of something bigger than yourself.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Spieth shot ___ in the final round of the 2012 NCAA Championships

“I can’t believe his missed that putt. If he makes that putt, we win.”
No one has ever purposely missed a putt when it counted. We can all agree on that.
Apologies up front, I write how I talk, it’s not the best for writing according to my English 201 professor but whatever, here goes…….
I have spent a lifetime studying teams, individuals on teams, coaches, coaching philosophy, what makes people tick and most importantly, how to get people to rise to the occasion and play above their skill-set in the biggest moments. In my studies, one way or another, all great programs commit to 3 basic aspects.
I have no formal training, except the school of hard-knocks. Watching personalities interact on a team or in a program is extremely interesting. With a mind-set of “look, listen, learn”, I have spent roughly 10,000 hours over the past 20 years with some of the greatest minds in sports performance.
Again, no PHD, no masters, just blessed to be around some phenomenal people who love to think outside the box. 3 simple focal points are consistent.
#1 – Be positive, #2 – Don’t be critical of your teammates or coaches and #3 – have a strong desire to be apart of something bigger than yourself. So easy to say, but so hard for us to do……
Think about it for a second. Simply be positive, like BE POSITIVE. How many parents sit on a sideline or roam the golf course and are just simply positive? NOT MANY is the answer. How many players are positive about their teammates play? Most are critical of everything, like, weather, conditions of the greens, how the tournament is being ran or how a teammate is playing poorly. Like any teammate has ever purposely played poorly to keep his/her team from winning a tournament? So be POSITIVE. Even on the ride home, find only positive things to say. Focus on effort, attitude, response to adversity, etc.
Being critical is human nature. “It’s the coaches fault”, “we would have won if johnny just would have made that putt”, “we don’t practice putting enough”, “johnny shouldn’t the 5th player it should be jerry”……or whatever….do anything but take accountability and responsibility for your own actions. Like the coach doesn’t try to make his team better….Like a player missing a putt on purpose…. you bet, that’s like saying the player fumbled the ball on purpose to keep his team from winning….doesn’t happen, right?
Parents are often the experts on what kid should be playing in what position, only they are not at practice and they do not possess all of the data points for the decision made. Instead, players and parent blame teammates and coaches for everything. Why not defend your coach? Why not defend your teammate? For example, if your mom or dad is chipping on one of your teammates/coaches, why not respond with “Mom, I know you want us to win and so do I. Johnny works exceptionally hard at practice and you criticizing him only creates doubt in my head and makes our team weaker.” Could you imagine the look on the parents face? So defend your coach, defend your teammates, do it respectfully, but do it ALWAYS. One day, you will need them to make a putt or execute on a shot to win a tournament, or a state title. So be loyal to your coach and your teammates.
Any finally, be apart of something bigger than yourself. Playing college golf is a team sport. Most college coaches, if not all care about how you treat your teammates. All great teams accomplish great tasks by truly caring and working together. Sooooo easy to say, but soooooo hard for a lot to do because it might steal the attention off of YOU. For example, the #1 player on the team cares more about winning the tournament individually than winning it as a team. Would you finish 2nd or 3rd in a tournament if it meant your team won the overall tournament?
Think about it, nobody remembers what Jordan Spieth shot in the 2012 NCAA finals. But we all know he and the Texas Longhorns won the championship in dramatic fashion. You can’t win anything alone, some where, somebody has to help you win.
Be positive, don’t be critical of your teammates/coaches and want to be apart of something bigger than yourself.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

Don’t watch golf like a fan and expect to play on the PGA Tour

College Golf Camps

“Play with FCT vs PAT”

If you want to play golf in college or on the PGA, do not watch the next golf tournament like a fan. Watch it like you’re going to hit the next shot or make the next putt.

With the data you have, think like the player you’re watching. What’s my distance, where is the wind, where is the pin, etc. Play with Focus, Calmness and Toughness. Avoid the P.A.T. as we call it, which is Pressure, Anxiety and Tension.

Playing P.A.T. is sure fire way to rob yourself of your potential. When you learn to play with F.C.T., Focus, Calmness, Toughness, the game gets a whole lot easier because you’re learning how to compete with confidence and letting your body deal with stress.

So ask yourself, “do I play with FCT or PAT?”

It’s so important yet so few understand.  I’m tellin you right now, this stuff works.

In my opinion, one of the greatest training tools is visualization. If you can’t see the shot, you won’t hit the shot. If you can see the shot, assuming you’re playing with FCT, you give yourself the best chance at executing on the shot. And then most importantly, you have to accept the result and move on.

Golf is about concentrating for 4-5 seconds at a time, right? Walking to your next shot, selecting your shot/club, pre-shot routine, concentrate for 4-5 seconds, swing and repeat multiple times throughout a round.

As parents, we all want what is best for our kids. He or She might be the next Tiger Woods, Anika Sorenstam or whatever. Regardless, keep it in perspective. We’re trying to develop confidence. You can’t be great without confidence.

So is your junior golfer growing and getting better? If the answer is YES, then great keep it up. If the answer is NO or I don’t know, maybe change the narrative to play golf with Focus, Calmness and Toughness and watch the confidence grow.

Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Thanks for taking the time to read yet another grammatically error-filled message. Kids, pay attention in English 101……..

You may text me more questions at 469-759-7765
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Don’t watch golf like a fan and expect to play on the PGA Tour

College Golf Camps

“Play with FCT vs PAT”

If you want to play golf in college or on the PGA, do not watch the next golf tournament like a fan. Watch it like you’re going to hit the next shot or make the next putt.

With the data you have, think like the player you’re watching. What’s my distance, where is the wind, where is the pin, etc. Play with Focus, Calmness and Toughness. Avoid the P.A.T. as we call it, which is Pressure, Anxiety and Tension.

Playing P.A.T. is sure fire way to rob yourself of your potential. When you learn to play with F.C.T., Focus, Calmness, Toughness, the game gets a whole lot easier because you’re learning how to compete with confidence and letting your body deal with stress.

So ask yourself, “do I play with FCT or PAT?”

It’s so important yet so few understand.  I’m tellin you right now, this stuff works.

In my opinion, one of the greatest training tools is visualization. If you can’t see the shot, you won’t hit the shot. If you can see the shot, assuming you’re playing with FCT, you give yourself the best chance at executing on the shot. And then most importantly, you have to accept the result and move on.

Golf is about concentrating for 4-5 seconds at a time, right? Walking to your next shot, selecting your shot/club, pre-shot routine, concentrate for 4-5 seconds, swing and repeat multiple times throughout a round.

As parents, we all want what is best for our kids. He or She might be the next Tiger Woods, Anika Sorenstam or whatever. Regardless, keep it in perspective. We’re trying to develop confidence. You can’t be great without confidence.

So is your junior golfer growing and getting better? If the answer is YES, then great keep it up. If the answer is NO or I don’t know, maybe change the narrative to play golf with Focus, Calmness and Toughness and watch the confidence grow.

Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Thanks for taking the time to read yet another grammatically error-filled message. Kids, pay attention in English 101……..

You may text me more questions at 469-759-7765
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Crossed off the Recruiting List and you didn’t even know it…….

 

College Golf Camps

“You were crossed off and you didn’t even know it”
Over the past 6 years, we have listened to hundreds of College Golf Coaches talk about junior golf. We have heard dozens and dozens of examples of horrible stories you would never believe.
For example, a coach once described a day they crossed a recruit “off the list”. The short-story goes something like this. Coach shows up to a tournament. Coach pulls in the parking lot and happens to park a couple cars down from this potential recruit. Coach gets out of the car, the junior golfer and the parents are at the trunk getting clubs out. Parent politely gives the junior golfer a “red” Gatorade for the round. Junior golfer immediately barks back at the parent and says “mom, I said blue Gatorade not red, now get me a blue one.”
The coach got back in the car and drove away. The coach heard how the junior golfer treated the parents. The junior golfer didn’t know and neither did the parents that the coach heard. The coach crossed the potential recruit off the list, never again contacted the recruit.
The point is this, the recruit was crossed off the list and they didn’t even know it. Why? Because of how they treated their parents. Coaches have routinely said, “eventually they will probably treat us like they treat their parents.” Meaning, once you’re at their school and become comfortable, you’re likely to have the same attitude problem.
Moral of the story is simple, don’t get crossed off the list because you never know who might be watching or listening. And thank your parents for the time, money and energy they invest into you and your dream of playing college golf.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Thanks for taking the time to read this simple message and I apologize for any grammatical errors.  Should have paid more attention in English 101……..
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Crossed off the Recruiting List and you didn’t even know it…….

 

College Golf Camps

“You were crossed off and you didn’t even know it”
Over the past 6 years, we have listened to hundreds of College Golf Coaches talk about junior golf. We have heard dozens and dozens of examples of horrible stories you would never believe.
For example, a coach once described a day they crossed a recruit “off the list”. The short-story goes something like this. Coach shows up to a tournament. Coach pulls in the parking lot and happens to park a couple cars down from this potential recruit. Coach gets out of the car, the junior golfer and the parents are at the trunk getting clubs out. Parent politely gives the junior golfer a “red” Gatorade for the round. Junior golfer immediately barks back at the parent and says “mom, I said blue Gatorade not red, now get me a blue one.”
The coach got back in the car and drove away. The coach heard how the junior golfer treated the parents. The junior golfer didn’t know and neither did the parents that the coach heard. The coach crossed the potential recruit off the list, never again contacted the recruit.
The point is this, the recruit was crossed off the list and they didn’t even know it. Why? Because of how they treated their parents. Coaches have routinely said, “eventually they will probably treat us like they treat their parents.” Meaning, once you’re at their school and become comfortable, you’re likely to have the same attitude problem.
Moral of the story is simple, don’t get crossed off the list because you never know who might be watching or listening. And thank your parents for the time, money and energy they invest into you and your dream of playing college golf.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Thanks for taking the time to read this simple message and I apologize for any grammatical errors.  Should have paid more attention in English 101……..
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Ria Scott named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Congrats to Ria Scott on being named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Coach Scott has worked our camps the past 3 years. 

Read more here

“I believe in the academic mission of the University of Virginia and the trajectory in which this athletic department is headed,” Scott said. “I was incredibly impressed by Virginia’s commitment to its golf programs, shown by the investment in its new golf facility and the renovation scheduled for Birdwood Golf Course. I am excited to build on the strong foundation that Jan Mann, Kim Lewellen and our alumnae have set for our program. I am looking forward to working with our current and next generation of Hoos and am excited that current assistant coach Calle Nielson will remain a part of the program. I am committed to working tirelessly to make the University of Virginia proud.”

“I have been blessed to work with some exceptional student-athletes in my 11-year coaching career and I hope each one of them knows that they have had a positive impact on me. I want to thank Carla Williams and Todd Goodale (UVA women’s golf sport administrator) for believing in me and for already valuing me as part of their team.”

Before becoming a coach, Scott played professionally around the world. Her professional highlights include appearances in the 2006 Women’s World Cup in South Africa and the 2004 U.S. Women’s Open. Scott was the first woman to compete in an Asian PGA event, competing in the 2004 DHL Philippine Open.

As a student-athlete at California, she led the Bears to the 2003 NCAA Championships and was a 2003 All-Pac-10 and 2002 All-Region honoree. As a senior co-captain in her final season, she helped the Bears win a school-record seven tournaments, capture Pac-10 and NCAA regional titles, and rank as high as second nationally. The two-time Pac-10 All-Academic honorable mention selection also won the 2003 Anna Espenschade Award, presented to the top graduating female student-athlete at Cal.

As a prep, the Philippines native started the golf program at James Logan High School in Union City, Calif., where she captained the boys’ team her final three years. She won the 1997 California Junior Girl’s Championship at Pebble Beach less than four years after she picked up her first golf club.

Ria Scott named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Congrats to Ria Scott on being named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Coach Scott has worked our camps the past 3 years. 

Read more here

“I believe in the academic mission of the University of Virginia and the trajectory in which this athletic department is headed,” Scott said. “I was incredibly impressed by Virginia’s commitment to its golf programs, shown by the investment in its new golf facility and the renovation scheduled for Birdwood Golf Course. I am excited to build on the strong foundation that Jan Mann, Kim Lewellen and our alumnae have set for our program. I am looking forward to working with our current and next generation of Hoos and am excited that current assistant coach Calle Nielson will remain a part of the program. I am committed to working tirelessly to make the University of Virginia proud.”

“I have been blessed to work with some exceptional student-athletes in my 11-year coaching career and I hope each one of them knows that they have had a positive impact on me. I want to thank Carla Williams and Todd Goodale (UVA women’s golf sport administrator) for believing in me and for already valuing me as part of their team.”

Before becoming a coach, Scott played professionally around the world. Her professional highlights include appearances in the 2006 Women’s World Cup in South Africa and the 2004 U.S. Women’s Open. Scott was the first woman to compete in an Asian PGA event, competing in the 2004 DHL Philippine Open.

As a student-athlete at California, she led the Bears to the 2003 NCAA Championships and was a 2003 All-Pac-10 and 2002 All-Region honoree. As a senior co-captain in her final season, she helped the Bears win a school-record seven tournaments, capture Pac-10 and NCAA regional titles, and rank as high as second nationally. The two-time Pac-10 All-Academic honorable mention selection also won the 2003 Anna Espenschade Award, presented to the top graduating female student-athlete at Cal.

As a prep, the Philippines native started the golf program at James Logan High School in Union City, Calif., where she captained the boys’ team her final three years. She won the 1997 California Junior Girl’s Championship at Pebble Beach less than four years after she picked up her first golf club.

Scroll to top