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Spieth shot ___ in the final round of the 2012 NCAA Championships

“I can’t believe his missed that putt. If he makes that putt, we win.”
No one has ever purposely missed a putt when it counted. We can all agree on that.
Apologies up front, I write how I talk, it’s not the best for writing according to my English 201 professor but whatever, here goes…….
I have spent a lifetime studying teams, individuals on teams, coaches, coaching philosophy, what makes people tick and most importantly, how to get people to rise to the occasion and play above their skill-set in the biggest moments. In my studies, one way or another, all great programs commit to 3 basic aspects.
I have no formal training, except the school of hard-knocks. Watching personalities interact on a team or in a program is extremely interesting. With a mind-set of “look, listen, learn”, I have spent roughly 10,000 hours over the past 20 years with some of the greatest minds in sports performance.
Again, no PHD, no masters, just blessed to be around some phenomenal people who love to think outside the box. 3 simple focal points are consistent.
#1 – Be positive, #2 – Don’t be critical of your teammates or coaches and #3 – have a strong desire to be apart of something bigger than yourself. So easy to say, but so hard for us to do……
Think about it for a second. Simply be positive, like BE POSITIVE. How many parents sit on a sideline or roam the golf course and are just simply positive? NOT MANY is the answer. How many players are positive about their teammates play? Most are critical of everything, like, weather, conditions of the greens, how the tournament is being ran or how a teammate is playing poorly. Like any teammate has ever purposely played poorly to keep his/her team from winning a tournament? So be POSITIVE. Even on the ride home, find only positive things to say. Focus on effort, attitude, response to adversity, etc.
Being critical is human nature. “It’s the coaches fault”, “we would have won if johnny just would have made that putt”, “we don’t practice putting enough”, “johnny shouldn’t the 5th player it should be jerry”……or whatever….do anything but take accountability and responsibility for your own actions. Like the coach doesn’t try to make his team better….Like a player missing a putt on purpose…. you bet, that’s like saying the player fumbled the ball on purpose to keep his team from winning….doesn’t happen, right?
Parents are often the experts on what kid should be playing in what position, only they are not at practice and they do not possess all of the data points for the decision made. Instead, players and parent blame teammates and coaches for everything. Why not defend your coach? Why not defend your teammate? For example, if your mom or dad is chipping on one of your teammates/coaches, why not respond with “Mom, I know you want us to win and so do I. Johnny works exceptionally hard at practice and you criticizing him only creates doubt in my head and makes our team weaker.” Could you imagine the look on the parents face? So defend your coach, defend your teammates, do it respectfully, but do it ALWAYS. One day, you will need them to make a putt or execute on a shot to win a tournament, or a state title. So be loyal to your coach and your teammates.
Any finally, be apart of something bigger than yourself. Playing college golf is a team sport. Most college coaches, if not all care about how you treat your teammates. All great teams accomplish great tasks by truly caring and working together. Sooooo easy to say, but soooooo hard for a lot to do because it might steal the attention off of YOU. For example, the #1 player on the team cares more about winning the tournament individually than winning it as a team. Would you finish 2nd or 3rd in a tournament if it meant your team won the overall tournament?
Think about it, nobody remembers what Jordan Spieth shot in the 2012 NCAA finals. But we all know he and the Texas Longhorns won the championship in dramatic fashion. You can’t win anything alone, some where, somebody has to help you win.
Be positive, don’t be critical of your teammates/coaches and want to be apart of something bigger than yourself.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Spieth shot ___ in the final round of the 2012 NCAA Championships

“I can’t believe his missed that putt. If he makes that putt, we win.”
No one has ever purposely missed a putt when it counted. We can all agree on that.
Apologies up front, I write how I talk, it’s not the best for writing according to my English 201 professor but whatever, here goes…….
I have spent a lifetime studying teams, individuals on teams, coaches, coaching philosophy, what makes people tick and most importantly, how to get people to rise to the occasion and play above their skill-set in the biggest moments. In my studies, one way or another, all great programs commit to 3 basic aspects.
I have no formal training, except the school of hard-knocks. Watching personalities interact on a team or in a program is extremely interesting. With a mind-set of “look, listen, learn”, I have spent roughly 10,000 hours over the past 20 years with some of the greatest minds in sports performance.
Again, no PHD, no masters, just blessed to be around some phenomenal people who love to think outside the box. 3 simple focal points are consistent.
#1 – Be positive, #2 – Don’t be critical of your teammates or coaches and #3 – have a strong desire to be apart of something bigger than yourself. So easy to say, but so hard for us to do……
Think about it for a second. Simply be positive, like BE POSITIVE. How many parents sit on a sideline or roam the golf course and are just simply positive? NOT MANY is the answer. How many players are positive about their teammates play? Most are critical of everything, like, weather, conditions of the greens, how the tournament is being ran or how a teammate is playing poorly. Like any teammate has ever purposely played poorly to keep his/her team from winning a tournament? So be POSITIVE. Even on the ride home, find only positive things to say. Focus on effort, attitude, response to adversity, etc.
Being critical is human nature. “It’s the coaches fault”, “we would have won if johnny just would have made that putt”, “we don’t practice putting enough”, “johnny shouldn’t the 5th player it should be jerry”……or whatever….do anything but take accountability and responsibility for your own actions. Like the coach doesn’t try to make his team better….Like a player missing a putt on purpose…. you bet, that’s like saying the player fumbled the ball on purpose to keep his team from winning….doesn’t happen, right?
Parents are often the experts on what kid should be playing in what position, only they are not at practice and they do not possess all of the data points for the decision made. Instead, players and parent blame teammates and coaches for everything. Why not defend your coach? Why not defend your teammate? For example, if your mom or dad is chipping on one of your teammates/coaches, why not respond with “Mom, I know you want us to win and so do I. Johnny works exceptionally hard at practice and you criticizing him only creates doubt in my head and makes our team weaker.” Could you imagine the look on the parents face? So defend your coach, defend your teammates, do it respectfully, but do it ALWAYS. One day, you will need them to make a putt or execute on a shot to win a tournament, or a state title. So be loyal to your coach and your teammates.
Any finally, be apart of something bigger than yourself. Playing college golf is a team sport. Most college coaches, if not all care about how you treat your teammates. All great teams accomplish great tasks by truly caring and working together. Sooooo easy to say, but soooooo hard for a lot to do because it might steal the attention off of YOU. For example, the #1 player on the team cares more about winning the tournament individually than winning it as a team. Would you finish 2nd or 3rd in a tournament if it meant your team won the overall tournament?
Think about it, nobody remembers what Jordan Spieth shot in the 2012 NCAA finals. But we all know he and the Texas Longhorns won the championship in dramatic fashion. You can’t win anything alone, some where, somebody has to help you win.
Be positive, don’t be critical of your teammates/coaches and want to be apart of something bigger than yourself.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

Don’t watch golf like a fan and expect to play on the PGA Tour

College Golf Camps

“Play with FCT vs PAT”

If you want to play golf in college or on the PGA, do not watch the next golf tournament like a fan. Watch it like you’re going to hit the next shot or make the next putt.

With the data you have, think like the player you’re watching. What’s my distance, where is the wind, where is the pin, etc. Play with Focus, Calmness and Toughness. Avoid the P.A.T. as we call it, which is Pressure, Anxiety and Tension.

Playing P.A.T. is sure fire way to rob yourself of your potential. When you learn to play with F.C.T., Focus, Calmness, Toughness, the game gets a whole lot easier because you’re learning how to compete with confidence and letting your body deal with stress.

So ask yourself, “do I play with FCT or PAT?”

It’s so important yet so few understand.  I’m tellin you right now, this stuff works.

In my opinion, one of the greatest training tools is visualization. If you can’t see the shot, you won’t hit the shot. If you can see the shot, assuming you’re playing with FCT, you give yourself the best chance at executing on the shot. And then most importantly, you have to accept the result and move on.

Golf is about concentrating for 4-5 seconds at a time, right? Walking to your next shot, selecting your shot/club, pre-shot routine, concentrate for 4-5 seconds, swing and repeat multiple times throughout a round.

As parents, we all want what is best for our kids. He or She might be the next Tiger Woods, Anika Sorenstam or whatever. Regardless, keep it in perspective. We’re trying to develop confidence. You can’t be great without confidence.

So is your junior golfer growing and getting better? If the answer is YES, then great keep it up. If the answer is NO or I don’t know, maybe change the narrative to play golf with Focus, Calmness and Toughness and watch the confidence grow.

Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Thanks for taking the time to read yet another grammatically error-filled message. Kids, pay attention in English 101……..

You may text me more questions at 469-759-7765
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Don’t watch golf like a fan and expect to play on the PGA Tour

College Golf Camps

“Play with FCT vs PAT”

If you want to play golf in college or on the PGA, do not watch the next golf tournament like a fan. Watch it like you’re going to hit the next shot or make the next putt.

With the data you have, think like the player you’re watching. What’s my distance, where is the wind, where is the pin, etc. Play with Focus, Calmness and Toughness. Avoid the P.A.T. as we call it, which is Pressure, Anxiety and Tension.

Playing P.A.T. is sure fire way to rob yourself of your potential. When you learn to play with F.C.T., Focus, Calmness, Toughness, the game gets a whole lot easier because you’re learning how to compete with confidence and letting your body deal with stress.

So ask yourself, “do I play with FCT or PAT?”

It’s so important yet so few understand.  I’m tellin you right now, this stuff works.

In my opinion, one of the greatest training tools is visualization. If you can’t see the shot, you won’t hit the shot. If you can see the shot, assuming you’re playing with FCT, you give yourself the best chance at executing on the shot. And then most importantly, you have to accept the result and move on.

Golf is about concentrating for 4-5 seconds at a time, right? Walking to your next shot, selecting your shot/club, pre-shot routine, concentrate for 4-5 seconds, swing and repeat multiple times throughout a round.

As parents, we all want what is best for our kids. He or She might be the next Tiger Woods, Anika Sorenstam or whatever. Regardless, keep it in perspective. We’re trying to develop confidence. You can’t be great without confidence.

So is your junior golfer growing and getting better? If the answer is YES, then great keep it up. If the answer is NO or I don’t know, maybe change the narrative to play golf with Focus, Calmness and Toughness and watch the confidence grow.

Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Thanks for taking the time to read yet another grammatically error-filled message. Kids, pay attention in English 101……..

You may text me more questions at 469-759-7765
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Crossed off the Recruiting List and you didn’t even know it…….

 

College Golf Camps

“You were crossed off and you didn’t even know it”
Over the past 6 years, we have listened to hundreds of College Golf Coaches talk about junior golf. We have heard dozens and dozens of examples of horrible stories you would never believe.
For example, a coach once described a day they crossed a recruit “off the list”. The short-story goes something like this. Coach shows up to a tournament. Coach pulls in the parking lot and happens to park a couple cars down from this potential recruit. Coach gets out of the car, the junior golfer and the parents are at the trunk getting clubs out. Parent politely gives the junior golfer a “red” Gatorade for the round. Junior golfer immediately barks back at the parent and says “mom, I said blue Gatorade not red, now get me a blue one.”
The coach got back in the car and drove away. The coach heard how the junior golfer treated the parents. The junior golfer didn’t know and neither did the parents that the coach heard. The coach crossed the potential recruit off the list, never again contacted the recruit.
The point is this, the recruit was crossed off the list and they didn’t even know it. Why? Because of how they treated their parents. Coaches have routinely said, “eventually they will probably treat us like they treat their parents.” Meaning, once you’re at their school and become comfortable, you’re likely to have the same attitude problem.
Moral of the story is simple, don’t get crossed off the list because you never know who might be watching or listening. And thank your parents for the time, money and energy they invest into you and your dream of playing college golf.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Thanks for taking the time to read this simple message and I apologize for any grammatical errors.  Should have paid more attention in English 101……..
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Crossed off the Recruiting List and you didn’t even know it…….

 

College Golf Camps

“You were crossed off and you didn’t even know it”
Over the past 6 years, we have listened to hundreds of College Golf Coaches talk about junior golf. We have heard dozens and dozens of examples of horrible stories you would never believe.
For example, a coach once described a day they crossed a recruit “off the list”. The short-story goes something like this. Coach shows up to a tournament. Coach pulls in the parking lot and happens to park a couple cars down from this potential recruit. Coach gets out of the car, the junior golfer and the parents are at the trunk getting clubs out. Parent politely gives the junior golfer a “red” Gatorade for the round. Junior golfer immediately barks back at the parent and says “mom, I said blue Gatorade not red, now get me a blue one.”
The coach got back in the car and drove away. The coach heard how the junior golfer treated the parents. The junior golfer didn’t know and neither did the parents that the coach heard. The coach crossed the potential recruit off the list, never again contacted the recruit.
The point is this, the recruit was crossed off the list and they didn’t even know it. Why? Because of how they treated their parents. Coaches have routinely said, “eventually they will probably treat us like they treat their parents.” Meaning, once you’re at their school and become comfortable, you’re likely to have the same attitude problem.
Moral of the story is simple, don’t get crossed off the list because you never know who might be watching or listening. And thank your parents for the time, money and energy they invest into you and your dream of playing college golf.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Thanks for taking the time to read this simple message and I apologize for any grammatical errors.  Should have paid more attention in English 101……..
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder
College Golf Camps of America, LLC

Ria Scott named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Congrats to Ria Scott on being named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Coach Scott has worked our camps the past 3 years. 

Read more here

“I believe in the academic mission of the University of Virginia and the trajectory in which this athletic department is headed,” Scott said. “I was incredibly impressed by Virginia’s commitment to its golf programs, shown by the investment in its new golf facility and the renovation scheduled for Birdwood Golf Course. I am excited to build on the strong foundation that Jan Mann, Kim Lewellen and our alumnae have set for our program. I am looking forward to working with our current and next generation of Hoos and am excited that current assistant coach Calle Nielson will remain a part of the program. I am committed to working tirelessly to make the University of Virginia proud.”

“I have been blessed to work with some exceptional student-athletes in my 11-year coaching career and I hope each one of them knows that they have had a positive impact on me. I want to thank Carla Williams and Todd Goodale (UVA women’s golf sport administrator) for believing in me and for already valuing me as part of their team.”

Before becoming a coach, Scott played professionally around the world. Her professional highlights include appearances in the 2006 Women’s World Cup in South Africa and the 2004 U.S. Women’s Open. Scott was the first woman to compete in an Asian PGA event, competing in the 2004 DHL Philippine Open.

As a student-athlete at California, she led the Bears to the 2003 NCAA Championships and was a 2003 All-Pac-10 and 2002 All-Region honoree. As a senior co-captain in her final season, she helped the Bears win a school-record seven tournaments, capture Pac-10 and NCAA regional titles, and rank as high as second nationally. The two-time Pac-10 All-Academic honorable mention selection also won the 2003 Anna Espenschade Award, presented to the top graduating female student-athlete at Cal.

As a prep, the Philippines native started the golf program at James Logan High School in Union City, Calif., where she captained the boys’ team her final three years. She won the 1997 California Junior Girl’s Championship at Pebble Beach less than four years after she picked up her first golf club.

Ria Scott named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Congrats to Ria Scott on being named Head Golf Coach at University of Virginia

Coach Scott has worked our camps the past 3 years. 

Read more here

“I believe in the academic mission of the University of Virginia and the trajectory in which this athletic department is headed,” Scott said. “I was incredibly impressed by Virginia’s commitment to its golf programs, shown by the investment in its new golf facility and the renovation scheduled for Birdwood Golf Course. I am excited to build on the strong foundation that Jan Mann, Kim Lewellen and our alumnae have set for our program. I am looking forward to working with our current and next generation of Hoos and am excited that current assistant coach Calle Nielson will remain a part of the program. I am committed to working tirelessly to make the University of Virginia proud.”

“I have been blessed to work with some exceptional student-athletes in my 11-year coaching career and I hope each one of them knows that they have had a positive impact on me. I want to thank Carla Williams and Todd Goodale (UVA women’s golf sport administrator) for believing in me and for already valuing me as part of their team.”

Before becoming a coach, Scott played professionally around the world. Her professional highlights include appearances in the 2006 Women’s World Cup in South Africa and the 2004 U.S. Women’s Open. Scott was the first woman to compete in an Asian PGA event, competing in the 2004 DHL Philippine Open.

As a student-athlete at California, she led the Bears to the 2003 NCAA Championships and was a 2003 All-Pac-10 and 2002 All-Region honoree. As a senior co-captain in her final season, she helped the Bears win a school-record seven tournaments, capture Pac-10 and NCAA regional titles, and rank as high as second nationally. The two-time Pac-10 All-Academic honorable mention selection also won the 2003 Anna Espenschade Award, presented to the top graduating female student-athlete at Cal.

As a prep, the Philippines native started the golf program at James Logan High School in Union City, Calif., where she captained the boys’ team her final three years. She won the 1997 California Junior Girl’s Championship at Pebble Beach less than four years after she picked up her first golf club.

Recruiting Calendar 2018-2019 “Dead Period vs. Quiet Period”

College Golf Camps

NCAA rules can be very confusing for junior golfers.  You need experts to answer the questions you have.  NCAA Men’s golf programs will have the following schedule effective August 1, 2018.

To be clear, NCAA coaches are allowed to attend camps during “Quiet Periods” but not junior golf tournaments.  Will you be competing in a junior golf tournament where NCAA coaches are not allowed?

College Golf Camps allows coaches to engage with junior golfers over a 2-3 day period.  It’s a wonderful opportunity to learn, compete, showcase, interact and gain exposure to college golf. 

Definitions:
“Dead Period” – During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

“Quiet Period” – During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

2018-2019 calendar:

o  (1) A coach may evaluate at the two events (showcase and combine) that are traditionally held in conjunction with the Golf Coaches Association of America National Convention: Evaluation Period

o  (2) The first official day of the Golf Coaches Association of America Convention to 12:01 a.m. on the day after the adjournment of the convention:  Dead Period

  • December 23January 1 (Dead Period)
  • April 8 – April 11 (Dead Period)

Recruiting Calendar 2018-2019 “Dead Period vs. Quiet Period”

College Golf Camps

NCAA rules can be very confusing for junior golfers.  You need experts to answer the questions you have.  NCAA Men’s golf programs will have the following schedule effective August 1, 2018.

To be clear, NCAA coaches are allowed to attend camps during “Quiet Periods” but not junior golf tournaments.  Will you be competing in a junior golf tournament where NCAA coaches are not allowed?

College Golf Camps allows coaches to engage with junior golfers over a 2-3 day period.  It’s a wonderful opportunity to learn, compete, showcase, interact and gain exposure to college golf. 

Definitions:
“Dead Period” – During a dead period a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

“Quiet Period” – During a quiet period, a college coach may only have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents on the college’s campus. A coach may not watch student-athletes compete (unless a competition occurs on the college’s campus) or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

2018-2019 calendar:

o  (1) A coach may evaluate at the two events (showcase and combine) that are traditionally held in conjunction with the Golf Coaches Association of America National Convention: Evaluation Period

o  (2) The first official day of the Golf Coaches Association of America Convention to 12:01 a.m. on the day after the adjournment of the convention:  Dead Period

  • December 23January 1 (Dead Period)
  • April 8 – April 11 (Dead Period)

NCAA Division 1 Golf Recruiting Rules Explained

NCAA Division 1 Golf Recruiting Rules Explained

College Golf Camp is NOT a recruiting service, however, it’s for junior golfers to understand and know the the NCAA Division 1 Golf Recruiting Rules.  Coaches have certain guidelines they must follow 

NCAA Division I Golf recruiting calendar runs August 1st, 2017 through July 31st, 2018.

Here are some examples.

As a Sophomore in high school

Camps Yes
Recruiting Material You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.
Telephone Calls You can call the coach at your own expense.
Coach cannot call you.
Off-Campus Contact Not Permitted
Official Visits Not Permitted
Unofficial Visits Unlimited (changing August 1, 2018)

As a Junior in High School

Camps Yes
Recruiting Material You can begin to receive recruiting material and information from the coach on September 1st.
Telephone Calls You can call the coach at your own expense.
Coach can call you starting September 1st of your Junior year.
Electronic Correspondence (i.e. texts, IM, email.) All forms of electronic correspondence are allowed starting September 1st of your Junior Year.
Correspondence must be private between athlete & coach.
Off-Campus Contact Allowed July 1st after your Junior year.
Official Visits Not Permitted
Unofficial Visits Unlimited(changing August 1, 2018)

As a Senior in High School

Camps Yes
Recruiting Material You can receive material and information from the coach
Telephone Calls You can call the coach at your own expense.
Coach can call you.
Electronic Correspondence (i.e. texts, IM, email.) All forms of electronic correspondence are allowed starting September 1st of your Junior Year.
Correspondence must be private between athlete & coach.
Off-Campus Contact Allowed but no more than 3 times.
Official Visits You can start official visits on the opening day of your classes.
You get one per college and a maximum of 5 visits to D1, and unlimited visits to D2, D3 and NAIA schools.
Unofficial visits Unlimited (changing August 1, 2018)

NCAA Division 1 Golf Recruiting Rules Explained

NCAA Division 1 Golf Recruiting Rules Explained

College Golf Camp is NOT a recruiting service, however, it’s for junior golfers to understand and know the the NCAA Division 1 Golf Recruiting Rules.  Coaches have certain guidelines they must follow 

NCAA Division I Golf recruiting calendar runs August 1st, 2017 through July 31st, 2018.

Here are some examples.

As a Sophomore in high school

Camps Yes
Recruiting Material You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.
Telephone Calls You can call the coach at your own expense.
Coach cannot call you.
Off-Campus Contact Not Permitted
Official Visits Not Permitted
Unofficial Visits Unlimited (changing August 1, 2018)

As a Junior in High School

Camps Yes
Recruiting Material You can begin to receive recruiting material and information from the coach on September 1st.
Telephone Calls You can call the coach at your own expense.
Coach can call you starting September 1st of your Junior year.
Electronic Correspondence (i.e. texts, IM, email.) All forms of electronic correspondence are allowed starting September 1st of your Junior Year.
Correspondence must be private between athlete & coach.
Off-Campus Contact Allowed July 1st after your Junior year.
Official Visits Not Permitted
Unofficial Visits Unlimited(changing August 1, 2018)

As a Senior in High School

Camps Yes
Recruiting Material You can receive material and information from the coach
Telephone Calls You can call the coach at your own expense.
Coach can call you.
Electronic Correspondence (i.e. texts, IM, email.) All forms of electronic correspondence are allowed starting September 1st of your Junior Year.
Correspondence must be private between athlete & coach.
Off-Campus Contact Allowed but no more than 3 times.
Official Visits You can start official visits on the opening day of your classes.
You get one per college and a maximum of 5 visits to D1, and unlimited visits to D2, D3 and NAIA schools.
Unofficial visits Unlimited (changing August 1, 2018)

Turnbow named Tennessee Golf Foundation President

College Golf Camps advisory board member, Coach Turnbow takes on a new challenge in golf.  Congratulations to him and his family.

Tennessee Golf Foundation Chairman (TGF) Jim Seabury of Nashville announced that Middle Tennessee State University’s (MTSU) Senior Associate Athletic Director Whit Turnbow has been named as the new President of the TGF starting this fall.

Turnbow is a graduate of Middle Tennessee where over a 16-year career he served as golf coach then Senior Associate Athletic Director. As head men’s golf coach, he led his team to 15 championships, including six NCAA appearances, and was named Coach of the Year on three different occasions. In that role, he also secured funding for the completion of the Jeff Hendrix Golf Performance Center, which houses both the men’s and women’s golf teams. In 2017 he successfully bid and hosted a Division 1 NCAA Regional Championship at The Grove Club in College Grove, Tennessee. Turnbow’s teams had 100% graduation rate and a perfect 1000 Academic Performance Rating for eight consecutive years.

Whit, who is an accomplished amateur player himself, plays off a +3.6 handicap index. As Senior Associate AD at MTSU, he was instrumental in the creation of a new dynamic Strategic Facility Plan for MTSU athletics and has launched a successful $100 million capital campaign.

“Whit is a perfect fit for the next chapter of Tennessee golf. We see Whit having all the skills, character and personality to follow ongoing President Dick Horton. Dick was our chief executive for golf in our state for 45 years and grew Tennessee’ collective golf organization’s assets from $3,500 in 1973 to $22 million today. He will transition to Adviser to the Chairman on October 1” noted Seabury.
“I would like to thank Jim Seabury, Dick Horton, and the entire TGF search committee and board for their confidence in me. Having grown up in Tennessee junior golf, I am a direct beneficiary of the opportunities the foundation provides, and nothing excites me more than to have the privilege to build upon the work Dick and his team have done for so many years. Alongside the TGA and TPGA, we will continue to serve golfers of every level statewide,” said Turnbow.

Turnbow will manage and be responsible for growing the TGF endowment fund and its annual giving programs. Turnbow and Horton will be active in expanding legacy gifts to the TGF’s Honour Council from lifetime golfers and friends who embrace the foundation’s mission “To promote golf and its life enhancing values with an emphasis on teaching youth and the disadvantaged”.

Seabury points out that “We have excellent opportunities to grow the endowment. Like a college or university, our endowment will sustain us in the future and work to insure golf is affordable and accessible in Tennessee. Golf enjoys a passionate group of lifetime participants who credit its positive core values to their own successes in life”.

A Shelbyville, Tennessee native, Whit has been married for 17 years to his wife, Lori. They have two children, Reagan (10), and Connor (5).

ABOUT THE TENNESSEE GOLF FOUNDATION (TGF)

The TGF works in concert with both the Tennessee PGA and Tennessee Golf Association as the state’s youth golf development arm. TGF programs include The First Tee of Tennessee, the Sneds Tour, Middle School golf, the TPGA Junior Golf Academy, the Tennessee Junior Cup hosted by Scott Stallings, the Golf House Tennessee Learning Center, The Little Course at Conner Lane regional staff directors in four major cities, and the largest Special Olympic golf program in America. TGF also supports an active and growing PGA military veterans program and has produced The Vinny Invitational, Vince Gill’s 26-year old pro-celebrity event that has raised almost $8 Million for junior golf and youth development programs. More information on TGF can be found at www.tngolf.org.

 

Turnbow named Tennessee Golf Foundation President

College Golf Camps advisory board member, Coach Turnbow takes on a new challenge in golf.  Congratulations to him and his family.

Tennessee Golf Foundation Chairman (TGF) Jim Seabury of Nashville announced that Middle Tennessee State University’s (MTSU) Senior Associate Athletic Director Whit Turnbow has been named as the new President of the TGF starting this fall.

Turnbow is a graduate of Middle Tennessee where over a 16-year career he served as golf coach then Senior Associate Athletic Director. As head men’s golf coach, he led his team to 15 championships, including six NCAA appearances, and was named Coach of the Year on three different occasions. In that role, he also secured funding for the completion of the Jeff Hendrix Golf Performance Center, which houses both the men’s and women’s golf teams. In 2017 he successfully bid and hosted a Division 1 NCAA Regional Championship at The Grove Club in College Grove, Tennessee. Turnbow’s teams had 100% graduation rate and a perfect 1000 Academic Performance Rating for eight consecutive years.

Whit, who is an accomplished amateur player himself, plays off a +3.6 handicap index. As Senior Associate AD at MTSU, he was instrumental in the creation of a new dynamic Strategic Facility Plan for MTSU athletics and has launched a successful $100 million capital campaign.

“Whit is a perfect fit for the next chapter of Tennessee golf. We see Whit having all the skills, character and personality to follow ongoing President Dick Horton. Dick was our chief executive for golf in our state for 45 years and grew Tennessee’ collective golf organization’s assets from $3,500 in 1973 to $22 million today. He will transition to Adviser to the Chairman on October 1” noted Seabury.
“I would like to thank Jim Seabury, Dick Horton, and the entire TGF search committee and board for their confidence in me. Having grown up in Tennessee junior golf, I am a direct beneficiary of the opportunities the foundation provides, and nothing excites me more than to have the privilege to build upon the work Dick and his team have done for so many years. Alongside the TGA and TPGA, we will continue to serve golfers of every level statewide,” said Turnbow.

Turnbow will manage and be responsible for growing the TGF endowment fund and its annual giving programs. Turnbow and Horton will be active in expanding legacy gifts to the TGF’s Honour Council from lifetime golfers and friends who embrace the foundation’s mission “To promote golf and its life enhancing values with an emphasis on teaching youth and the disadvantaged”.

Seabury points out that “We have excellent opportunities to grow the endowment. Like a college or university, our endowment will sustain us in the future and work to insure golf is affordable and accessible in Tennessee. Golf enjoys a passionate group of lifetime participants who credit its positive core values to their own successes in life”.

A Shelbyville, Tennessee native, Whit has been married for 17 years to his wife, Lori. They have two children, Reagan (10), and Connor (5).

ABOUT THE TENNESSEE GOLF FOUNDATION (TGF)

The TGF works in concert with both the Tennessee PGA and Tennessee Golf Association as the state’s youth golf development arm. TGF programs include The First Tee of Tennessee, the Sneds Tour, Middle School golf, the TPGA Junior Golf Academy, the Tennessee Junior Cup hosted by Scott Stallings, the Golf House Tennessee Learning Center, The Little Course at Conner Lane regional staff directors in four major cities, and the largest Special Olympic golf program in America. TGF also supports an active and growing PGA military veterans program and has produced The Vinny Invitational, Vince Gill’s 26-year old pro-celebrity event that has raised almost $8 Million for junior golf and youth development programs. More information on TGF can be found at www.tngolf.org.

 

UW’s Coach Alan Murray commits to CGC – San Diego

Excited to announce, Head Men’s Golf Coach Alan Murray will be attend CGC – San Diego, July 5-7, 2018.

Coach Murray will be joined by the following coaching staff for this Junior Golf Exposure Camp.  Click here to learn more

Chris Zambri, Head Golf Coach – University of Southern California

Chris Riley, Head Golf Coach – University of San Diego

Allan Murray, Head Golf Coach – University of Washington

Jim Anderson, Head Golf Coach – University of Arizona

Glen Millican, Head Golf Coach – University of New Mexico

Ryan Donovan, Head Golf Coach – San Diego State University

Michael Beard, Head Golf Coach – Pepperdine University

Dan Potter, Head Golf Coach – Boise State University

Christian Newton, Head Golf Coach – Colorado State University

Justin Silverstein, Associate Head Coach – University of Southern California

Jacob Wilner, Head Golf Coach – University of Nevada

Ryan Jamison, Associate Head Golf Coach – Stanford University

Bill Spangler, Head Golf Coach – University of Nebraska

Andrew Larkin, Associate Head Golf Coach – UCLA

Richard Mueller, Head Golf Coach – Columbia

Jason D’AMore, Head Golf Coach – Loyola Marymount University

UW’s Coach Alan Murray commits to CGC – San Diego

Excited to announce, Head Men’s Golf Coach Alan Murray will be attend CGC – San Diego, July 5-7, 2018.

Coach Murray will be joined by the following coaching staff for this Junior Golf Exposure Camp.  Click here to learn more

Chris Zambri, Head Golf Coach – University of Southern California

Chris Riley, Head Golf Coach – University of San Diego

Allan Murray, Head Golf Coach – University of Washington

Jim Anderson, Head Golf Coach – University of Arizona

Glen Millican, Head Golf Coach – University of New Mexico

Ryan Donovan, Head Golf Coach – San Diego State University

Michael Beard, Head Golf Coach – Pepperdine University

Dan Potter, Head Golf Coach – Boise State University

Christian Newton, Head Golf Coach – Colorado State University

Justin Silverstein, Associate Head Coach – University of Southern California

Jacob Wilner, Head Golf Coach – University of Nevada

Ryan Jamison, Associate Head Golf Coach – Stanford University

Bill Spangler, Head Golf Coach – University of Nebraska

Andrew Larkin, Associate Head Golf Coach – UCLA

Richard Mueller, Head Golf Coach – Columbia

Jason D’AMore, Head Golf Coach – Loyola Marymount University

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