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Category: Golf Wellness

Spieth shot ___ in the final round of the 2012 NCAA Championships

“I can’t believe his missed that putt. If he makes that putt, we win.”
No one has ever purposely missed a putt when it counted. We can all agree on that.
Apologies up front, I write how I talk, it’s not the best for writing according to my English 201 professor but whatever, here goes…….
I have spent a lifetime studying teams, individuals on teams, coaches, coaching philosophy, what makes people tick and most importantly, how to get people to rise to the occasion and play above their skill-set in the biggest moments. In my studies, one way or another, all great programs commit to 3 basic aspects.
I have no formal training, except the school of hard-knocks. Watching personalities interact on a team or in a program is extremely interesting. With a mind-set of “look, listen, learn”, I have spent roughly 10,000 hours over the past 20 years with some of the greatest minds in sports performance.
Again, no PHD, no masters, just blessed to be around some phenomenal people who love to think outside the box. 3 simple focal points are consistent.
#1 – Be positive, #2 – Don’t be critical of your teammates or coaches and #3 – have a strong desire to be apart of something bigger than yourself. So easy to say, but so hard for us to do……
Think about it for a second. Simply be positive, like BE POSITIVE. How many parents sit on a sideline or roam the golf course and are just simply positive? NOT MANY is the answer. How many players are positive about their teammates play? Most are critical of everything, like, weather, conditions of the greens, how the tournament is being ran or how a teammate is playing poorly. Like any teammate has ever purposely played poorly to keep his/her team from winning a tournament? So be POSITIVE. Even on the ride home, find only positive things to say. Focus on effort, attitude, response to adversity, etc.
Being critical is human nature. “It’s the coaches fault”, “we would have won if johnny just would have made that putt”, “we don’t practice putting enough”, “johnny shouldn’t the 5th player it should be jerry”……or whatever….do anything but take accountability and responsibility for your own actions. Like the coach doesn’t try to make his team better….Like a player missing a putt on purpose…. you bet, that’s like saying the player fumbled the ball on purpose to keep his team from winning….doesn’t happen, right?
Parents are often the experts on what kid should be playing in what position, only they are not at practice and they do not possess all of the data points for the decision made. Instead, players and parent blame teammates and coaches for everything. Why not defend your coach? Why not defend your teammate? For example, if your mom or dad is chipping on one of your teammates/coaches, why not respond with “Mom, I know you want us to win and so do I. Johnny works exceptionally hard at practice and you criticizing him only creates doubt in my head and makes our team weaker.” Could you imagine the look on the parents face? So defend your coach, defend your teammates, do it respectfully, but do it ALWAYS. One day, you will need them to make a putt or execute on a shot to win a tournament, or a state title. So be loyal to your coach and your teammates.
Any finally, be apart of something bigger than yourself. Playing college golf is a team sport. Most college coaches, if not all care about how you treat your teammates. All great teams accomplish great tasks by truly caring and working together. Sooooo easy to say, but soooooo hard for a lot to do because it might steal the attention off of YOU. For example, the #1 player on the team cares more about winning the tournament individually than winning it as a team. Would you finish 2nd or 3rd in a tournament if it meant your team won the overall tournament?
Think about it, nobody remembers what Jordan Spieth shot in the 2012 NCAA finals. But we all know he and the Texas Longhorns won the championship in dramatic fashion. You can’t win anything alone, some where, somebody has to help you win.
Be positive, don’t be critical of your teammates/coaches and want to be apart of something bigger than yourself.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

Spieth shot ___ in the final round of the 2012 NCAA Championships

“I can’t believe his missed that putt. If he makes that putt, we win.”
No one has ever purposely missed a putt when it counted. We can all agree on that.
Apologies up front, I write how I talk, it’s not the best for writing according to my English 201 professor but whatever, here goes…….
I have spent a lifetime studying teams, individuals on teams, coaches, coaching philosophy, what makes people tick and most importantly, how to get people to rise to the occasion and play above their skill-set in the biggest moments. In my studies, one way or another, all great programs commit to 3 basic aspects.
I have no formal training, except the school of hard-knocks. Watching personalities interact on a team or in a program is extremely interesting. With a mind-set of “look, listen, learn”, I have spent roughly 10,000 hours over the past 20 years with some of the greatest minds in sports performance.
Again, no PHD, no masters, just blessed to be around some phenomenal people who love to think outside the box. 3 simple focal points are consistent.
#1 – Be positive, #2 – Don’t be critical of your teammates or coaches and #3 – have a strong desire to be apart of something bigger than yourself. So easy to say, but so hard for us to do……
Think about it for a second. Simply be positive, like BE POSITIVE. How many parents sit on a sideline or roam the golf course and are just simply positive? NOT MANY is the answer. How many players are positive about their teammates play? Most are critical of everything, like, weather, conditions of the greens, how the tournament is being ran or how a teammate is playing poorly. Like any teammate has ever purposely played poorly to keep his/her team from winning a tournament? So be POSITIVE. Even on the ride home, find only positive things to say. Focus on effort, attitude, response to adversity, etc.
Being critical is human nature. “It’s the coaches fault”, “we would have won if johnny just would have made that putt”, “we don’t practice putting enough”, “johnny shouldn’t the 5th player it should be jerry”……or whatever….do anything but take accountability and responsibility for your own actions. Like the coach doesn’t try to make his team better….Like a player missing a putt on purpose…. you bet, that’s like saying the player fumbled the ball on purpose to keep his team from winning….doesn’t happen, right?
Parents are often the experts on what kid should be playing in what position, only they are not at practice and they do not possess all of the data points for the decision made. Instead, players and parent blame teammates and coaches for everything. Why not defend your coach? Why not defend your teammate? For example, if your mom or dad is chipping on one of your teammates/coaches, why not respond with “Mom, I know you want us to win and so do I. Johnny works exceptionally hard at practice and you criticizing him only creates doubt in my head and makes our team weaker.” Could you imagine the look on the parents face? So defend your coach, defend your teammates, do it respectfully, but do it ALWAYS. One day, you will need them to make a putt or execute on a shot to win a tournament, or a state title. So be loyal to your coach and your teammates.
Any finally, be apart of something bigger than yourself. Playing college golf is a team sport. Most college coaches, if not all care about how you treat your teammates. All great teams accomplish great tasks by truly caring and working together. Sooooo easy to say, but soooooo hard for a lot to do because it might steal the attention off of YOU. For example, the #1 player on the team cares more about winning the tournament individually than winning it as a team. Would you finish 2nd or 3rd in a tournament if it meant your team won the overall tournament?
Think about it, nobody remembers what Jordan Spieth shot in the 2012 NCAA finals. But we all know he and the Texas Longhorns won the championship in dramatic fashion. You can’t win anything alone, some where, somebody has to help you win.
Be positive, don’t be critical of your teammates/coaches and want to be apart of something bigger than yourself.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

gospel on Junior Golf Resumes

One of the most talked about subjects at our camps is “how/when do we start contacting coaches?” First of all, there is no PERFECT timing. Start contacting coaches as soon as you have an interest in the program. We will touch upon this topic later in the week when we discuss “falling in love in mascots and school colors”.
Here is the gospel when it comes to junior golf resumes. Write this down because coaches say it happens daily with junior golf families. NEVER EVER send an email to a coach and address it as “Dear Coach” or worse yet, the wrong coaches name. Take the time to address it as “Dear Coach Walton” or whatever. If you can’t take the time to address it to correct person or individually, why should they open it? Or why should they show an interest in you when you can’t even address them by name? Got it?……
Here are the “BIG 5 Truth’s” about junior golf resumes. Stick to these basic approaches.
#1 – Do it yourself
You can do the resume yourself. You don’t need anyone to do this for you. The main reason is this. If you truly have that much interest in the university/golf program then you will do the research to find the coaches name and contact information. If you won’t take the time to do that, then are you really that interested? ALSO, VERY IMPORTANT, 95% of the time when a coach receives a resume from a “blast” email, it gets deleted before it even gets opened. So do the research yourself, don’t expect someone to care more than you do. And, MAYBE as important, PARENTS do not send the email for the junior golfer. Do you think the coaches are not smart enough to know the difference? Do you think a coach wants an email from the parent and not the junior golfer? Don’t make that mistake…..JUNIOR GOLFERS, you send the emails from your email address…..
#2 – Keep it simple
Coaches don’t care that you started playing golf at age 3. They care about your attitude, your effort, your academics, your scores, your rankings, etc. So keep it simple. Name, Year of Graduation, State, GPA, is usually enough because coaches will do the research on you.
#3 – Keep it short
Junior Golfers and parents want to write these beautiful resumes and emails, however, they don’t really matter. The shorter the better, for example, “Coach Ward, just a quick note, this past weekend I competed in our State Amateur. I shot 78, 73, 74 at 6900yds. I felt like I competed with confidence and learned a few things about my game that I need to address. My plan is address those challenges in the coming weeks. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” This statement shows #1 that you’re paying attention to their schedule, #2 you shared hard data which was the tournament, your scores and the distance played and #3 you shared what you did well, what you need to do better and how you plan to get better. #goodbetterhow
#4 – Keep it intimate
Refer to the “gospel” comment above, but also, know the program. For example, “Coach Ward, I followed your tournament this week in California, looks like you guys played well finishing 3rd by a shot. I can’t wait to compete like that with a close-knit group of teammates. Good luck next week in Hawaii.” Shows you’re a paying attention to their program and you care about something other than yourself.
#5 – Keep it consistent
You should be contacting the coaches every 10-14 days in some fashion or another. Why do you think Charmin spends so much money on marketing? Because they know that in order for you to buy Charmin Toilet paper they have to keep their brand in front of you. Same applies to junior golfers with college coaches, just minus the toilet paper.
Hope to see you camp someday, if not, good luck and play BIG!!
Cheers,
Nick, CEO, Founder, CGC

Spend 5 minutes a day to create more lag, more release thus more distance for junior golfers

Here is one of our favorite golfers of all time, Stan Utley.  Mr. Utley and his son attended one of our junior golf exposure camps in Dallas.  We talked about many many aspects of junior golf.  One topic of discussion was “how do we get junior golfers to release the golf club?”.  Further discussion brought us to the Orange Whip.  Mr. Utley firmly believes the Orange Whip naturally creates lag in the golf swing.  Thus creating a release of the golf club.  Listen to this great video with Mr. Utley.

“I use the Orange Whip to make sure my swing is how I want it” – William McGirt, PGA Tour Winner

Designed exclusively for juniors, the lighter weight and shorter length of the Orange Whip Junior, allows junior golfers to feel if they are maximizing their swing tempo and balance.

Three key components that make up the patented design of the Orange Whip Junior; a weighted orange ball, a counterweight, and a very flexible shaft.

The orange ball replaces the clubhead and allows you to focus on swinging naturally without worrying about the position of the club face. It’s weighted to promote a fluid swinging motion rather than a jerky hitting motion.

The counterweight balances the Orange Whip Compact, stabilizing your swing from the start through the finish. It’s essential in providing critical feedback on whether you are loading and unloading the golf club properly.

Our proprietary shaft naturally promotes the need to swing in rhythm creating synchronization between your arms, upper body, and lower body. The result is a perfect tempo and balanced swing creating more consistent and powerful shot-making on the course.

Feedback from the Orange Whip Mid-Size is instant and any wobble in the swing indicates a need to improve tempo and balance. Swinging it, you will naturally find the tour like motion needed to be a better golfer.

Benefits of Using the Orange Whip

One of the best and often overlooked features of the Orange Whip is the ability to use it indoors without compromising its unparalleled performance. It only requires a minimal amount of space and 5-10 minutes of training time per day. No golf swing trainer is more time efficient and effective. You can work with an Orange Whip year-round and never again have to depend on weather conditions or daylight when you want to improve your golf swing and fitness. It’s the ideal tool for those living in challenging winter environments and busy individuals with little time to practice.

The Foundation Drills are the core group of training exercises designed to maximize the effect of the Orange Whip. These can be performed in a single daily workout. To increase benefits to fitness and flexibility, 2 or more sets per day are recommended. In general, only 5 to 10 min every day is required to notice some results. This minimal time requirement makes it easy for almost anyone to incorporate these drills into their schedule.

When used regularly, the golfer will quickly see noticeable improvements in their golf swing such as, increased flexibility and strength, enhanced coordination, and a perfectly balanced tempo.

Flexibility
The weight on each end of the flexible shaft provides a low-impact stretch while swinging.

Strength
The Orange Whip provides a core muscle workout when used during repetitive motion drills. The wrists and forearms receive a workout doing various drills and during the hinging action while swinging.

Coordination
The Orange Whip synchronizes the arms and body while swinging it repetitively. If this motion is out of sync, the user will lose their balance and/or feel awkward.

Tempo
As the arms and body work together, a natural rhythm takes over the swing. This is how your tempo develops, some may be fast or slow, yet always in balance with an efficient motion.

With an Orange Whip, anyone can make the most out of the winter months and improve without hitting golf balls. If a golfer trains their swing without using a ball, the mind and body will allow the swing to develop naturally. The Orange Whip can eliminate the ‘hit’ instinct from your mind and consistency can be developed.

In addition, once a person athletically learns how to swing the Orange Whip, I encourage the user to try and feel where the Orange ball would release off the end of the shaft. This is a great mental exercise for those who want to improve the accuracy of their golf shots.

CAUTION:
When using the Orange Whip indoors, make sure there is sufficient space to swing freely in all directions. A garage or spaces with vaulted ceilings are ideal. Be sure to eliminate all obstacles and restrictions prior to swinging. Pay special attention to doors and entrance areas. Do not swing the whip near these areas and take the necessary precautions to avoid contact with unsuspecting persons entering a space near the path of the Whip.

Spend 5 minutes a day to create more lag, more release thus more distance for junior golfers

Here is one of our favorite golfers of all time, Stan Utley.  Mr. Utley and his son attended one of our junior golf exposure camps in Dallas.  We talked about many many aspects of junior golf.  One topic of discussion was “how do we get junior golfers to release the golf club?”.  Further discussion brought us to the Orange Whip.  Mr. Utley firmly believes the Orange Whip naturally creates lag in the golf swing.  Thus creating a release of the golf club.  Listen to this great video with Mr. Utley.

“I use the Orange Whip to make sure my swing is how I want it” – William McGirt, PGA Tour Winner

Designed exclusively for juniors, the lighter weight and shorter length of the Orange Whip Junior, allows junior golfers to feel if they are maximizing their swing tempo and balance.

Three key components that make up the patented design of the Orange Whip Junior; a weighted orange ball, a counterweight, and a very flexible shaft.

The orange ball replaces the clubhead and allows you to focus on swinging naturally without worrying about the position of the club face. It’s weighted to promote a fluid swinging motion rather than a jerky hitting motion.

The counterweight balances the Orange Whip Compact, stabilizing your swing from the start through the finish. It’s essential in providing critical feedback on whether you are loading and unloading the golf club properly.

Our proprietary shaft naturally promotes the need to swing in rhythm creating synchronization between your arms, upper body, and lower body. The result is a perfect tempo and balanced swing creating more consistent and powerful shot-making on the course.

Feedback from the Orange Whip Mid-Size is instant and any wobble in the swing indicates a need to improve tempo and balance. Swinging it, you will naturally find the tour like motion needed to be a better golfer.

Benefits of Using the Orange Whip

One of the best and often overlooked features of the Orange Whip is the ability to use it indoors without compromising its unparalleled performance. It only requires a minimal amount of space and 5-10 minutes of training time per day. No golf swing trainer is more time efficient and effective. You can work with an Orange Whip year-round and never again have to depend on weather conditions or daylight when you want to improve your golf swing and fitness. It’s the ideal tool for those living in challenging winter environments and busy individuals with little time to practice.

The Foundation Drills are the core group of training exercises designed to maximize the effect of the Orange Whip. These can be performed in a single daily workout. To increase benefits to fitness and flexibility, 2 or more sets per day are recommended. In general, only 5 to 10 min every day is required to notice some results. This minimal time requirement makes it easy for almost anyone to incorporate these drills into their schedule.

When used regularly, the golfer will quickly see noticeable improvements in their golf swing such as, increased flexibility and strength, enhanced coordination, and a perfectly balanced tempo.

Flexibility
The weight on each end of the flexible shaft provides a low-impact stretch while swinging.

Strength
The Orange Whip provides a core muscle workout when used during repetitive motion drills. The wrists and forearms receive a workout doing various drills and during the hinging action while swinging.

Coordination
The Orange Whip synchronizes the arms and body while swinging it repetitively. If this motion is out of sync, the user will lose their balance and/or feel awkward.

Tempo
As the arms and body work together, a natural rhythm takes over the swing. This is how your tempo develops, some may be fast or slow, yet always in balance with an efficient motion.

With an Orange Whip, anyone can make the most out of the winter months and improve without hitting golf balls. If a golfer trains their swing without using a ball, the mind and body will allow the swing to develop naturally. The Orange Whip can eliminate the ‘hit’ instinct from your mind and consistency can be developed.

In addition, once a person athletically learns how to swing the Orange Whip, I encourage the user to try and feel where the Orange ball would release off the end of the shaft. This is a great mental exercise for those who want to improve the accuracy of their golf shots.

CAUTION:
When using the Orange Whip indoors, make sure there is sufficient space to swing freely in all directions. A garage or spaces with vaulted ceilings are ideal. Be sure to eliminate all obstacles and restrictions prior to swinging. Pay special attention to doors and entrance areas. Do not swing the whip near these areas and take the necessary precautions to avoid contact with unsuspecting persons entering a space near the path of the Whip.

10 secrets to raise your SAT/ACT score with Prep Expert a Mark Cuban Company

College Golf Camps is focused on offering junior golfers everything they need to play college golf.  One of the most common questions at our camps is “What is a good SAT/ACT score?” or “How many times should I take the SAT/ACT?”.

College Golf Camps is not the expert in the test-taking field, however, we know the expert, Shaan Patel at prepexperts.com 

You may have heard of Shaan Patel.  He was originally on the show “Shark Tank”.  Mark Cuban invested and now Shaan is becoming a household name.

Shaan Patel, an associate of College Golf Camps is now offering a 50% discount on the following products.

1. 6-Week Flagship SAT/ACT Prep Course
2. 3-Week Fast Track SAT/ACT Prep Course
3. Self-Paced Video SAT/ACT Prep Course
4. Weekend Review SAT/ACT Prep Course
Please College Golf Camps and ask how to activate the 50% discount.

 

10 secrets to raise your SAT/ACT score with Prep Expert a Mark Cuban Company

College Golf Camps is focused on offering junior golfers everything they need to play college golf.  One of the most common questions at our camps is “What is a good SAT/ACT score?” or “How many times should I take the SAT/ACT?”.

College Golf Camps is not the expert in the test-taking field, however, we know the expert, Shaan Patel at prepexperts.com 

You may have heard of Shaan Patel.  He was originally on the show “Shark Tank”.  Mark Cuban invested and now Shaan is becoming a household name.

Shaan Patel, an associate of College Golf Camps is now offering a 50% discount on the following products.

1. 6-Week Flagship SAT/ACT Prep Course
2. 3-Week Fast Track SAT/ACT Prep Course
3. Self-Paced Video SAT/ACT Prep Course
4. Weekend Review SAT/ACT Prep Course
Please College Golf Camps and ask how to activate the 50% discount.

 

Athlete’s Mental Edge – how can YOU improve quickly!!

College Golf Camps is on a mission to improve junior golf.  What if you could predict future performance?  What if you could identify areas for improvement?  What if you could measure the “it” factor?

Every junior golfer sends college coaches their resumes filled with relatable data about their golf games.  Swing profile, tournament profile, stats, test scores, videos, etc.  Almost never do you see junior golfers measuring their mental game or their competitiveness.   What if you could provide your swing coach or college coaches your mental framework.  In terms of, how do you best respond to direction?  College Golf Camps research team has found a way to help identify your mental holes and more importantly how to fill them.

How would you respond to the following comments:

“I am more concerned about details and take more time to polish and perfect my skills than most people I know.”

“I am more capable of staying focused on the game in pressure situations than most people I know.”

“Other people in my life have to accept the fact that my education, my sport, or my career comes first.”

“Others would describe me as a person who performs extremely well under pressure.”

“I compete with myself physically.”

You need to take this test.  It will blow your mind.  Your development will soar to new heights.  More importantly, your trajectory for improvement will increase dramatically.

Would you like to take this test?

Dr. Nick Molinaro, a College Golf Camp associate uses this test to improve player performance.

 

Learn more about TAIS, click here

Athlete’s Mental Edge (AME) Fact Sheet

WHAT is AME?

AME is an innovative Web-based program designed to provide athletes with detailed mental toughness assessment and training strategies to help them perform better in competitive, pressure-filled situations. Critical performance factors include focus, confidence, discipline, and leadership.  AME is based on the internationally respected and widely used TAIS (The Attentional and Interpersonal Style) test, which was developed by Dr. Robert Nideffer in 1976. Every athlete, from the high profile professional to the weekend warrior, can now Perform Under PressureÔ by participating in the program and comparing their results with top athletes in various sports.

WHO can use AME?

Any recreational, amateur or professional athlete interested in performing at their fullest potential.

Coaches at any level interested in getting maximum effort out of their players.

Parents who want to help their sons or daughters to focus on success.

HOW does AME work?

Participants answer an easy-to-understand on-line inventory that measures attentional strengths and weaknesses, decision-making style and interpersonal preference.  Based on TAIS technology, AME provides a direct link between concentration, personality characteristics and performance.  AME provides a detailed diagnosis of the individual athlete and provides vital feedback that teaches users how to better concentrate and focus their minds in pressure-filled sports scenarios.  Aside from on-line instruction, users can take advantage of a team of leading sport psychology professionals that offer personalized face-to-face evaluation and assistance for athletes and teams.

WHERE does AME draw its information from?

Winning Mind has collected over 25 years of TAIS data from comparison groups including Olympians, professional athletes, coaches, high-level amateur athletes, military leaders, business executives and sales managers. AME comparison groups include MLB 1st Round Draft Picks, NBA players, coaches, NCAA football players, elite and amateur golfers, Olympic basketball, hockey, skiing, cycling and volleyball athletes and tennis pros.

 

Athlete’s Mental Edge – how can YOU improve quickly!!

College Golf Camps is on a mission to improve junior golf.  What if you could predict future performance?  What if you could identify areas for improvement?  What if you could measure the “it” factor?

Every junior golfer sends college coaches their resumes filled with relatable data about their golf games.  Swing profile, tournament profile, stats, test scores, videos, etc.  Almost never do you see junior golfers measuring their mental game or their competitiveness.   What if you could provide your swing coach or college coaches your mental framework.  In terms of, how do you best respond to direction?  College Golf Camps research team has found a way to help identify your mental holes and more importantly how to fill them.

How would you respond to the following comments:

“I am more concerned about details and take more time to polish and perfect my skills than most people I know.”

“I am more capable of staying focused on the game in pressure situations than most people I know.”

“Other people in my life have to accept the fact that my education, my sport, or my career comes first.”

“Others would describe me as a person who performs extremely well under pressure.”

“I compete with myself physically.”

You need to take this test.  It will blow your mind.  Your development will soar to new heights.  More importantly, your trajectory for improvement will increase dramatically.

Would you like to take this test?

Dr. Nick Molinaro, a College Golf Camp associate uses this test to improve player performance.

 

Learn more about TAIS, click here

Athlete’s Mental Edge (AME) Fact Sheet

WHAT is AME?

AME is an innovative Web-based program designed to provide athletes with detailed mental toughness assessment and training strategies to help them perform better in competitive, pressure-filled situations. Critical performance factors include focus, confidence, discipline, and leadership.  AME is based on the internationally respected and widely used TAIS (The Attentional and Interpersonal Style) test, which was developed by Dr. Robert Nideffer in 1976. Every athlete, from the high profile professional to the weekend warrior, can now Perform Under PressureÔ by participating in the program and comparing their results with top athletes in various sports.

WHO can use AME?

Any recreational, amateur or professional athlete interested in performing at their fullest potential.

Coaches at any level interested in getting maximum effort out of their players.

Parents who want to help their sons or daughters to focus on success.

HOW does AME work?

Participants answer an easy-to-understand on-line inventory that measures attentional strengths and weaknesses, decision-making style and interpersonal preference.  Based on TAIS technology, AME provides a direct link between concentration, personality characteristics and performance.  AME provides a detailed diagnosis of the individual athlete and provides vital feedback that teaches users how to better concentrate and focus their minds in pressure-filled sports scenarios.  Aside from on-line instruction, users can take advantage of a team of leading sport psychology professionals that offer personalized face-to-face evaluation and assistance for athletes and teams.

WHERE does AME draw its information from?

Winning Mind has collected over 25 years of TAIS data from comparison groups including Olympians, professional athletes, coaches, high-level amateur athletes, military leaders, business executives and sales managers. AME comparison groups include MLB 1st Round Draft Picks, NBA players, coaches, NCAA football players, elite and amateur golfers, Olympic basketball, hockey, skiing, cycling and volleyball athletes and tennis pros.

 

Ask questions, seek advice, it’s FREE information for junior golfers, parents, coaches, everyone!!

We have created a community of people through our junior golf camps that we are very proud of.  We have so many visitors asking great questions.  Here, we provide a stage for FREE information, advice and opinions, share joys and 3 putts, don’t mention the word shank.  Most importantly, we want you to  interact with other junior golfers, parents, coaches, instructors, etc.  College Golf Camps Forum 

Who are these regular visitors? Some are junior golfers or parents of junior golfers or coaches or whoever.  Some are experts in a field of study such as mental training, fitness, swing mechanics, etc 

Ask questions, volunteer advice, talk about your experiences … Anything related to golf….kind of like standing on a driving range…..

We ask that you take a minute to read the forum rules and etiquette.

What are the Forum Rules? College Golf Camps Forums 

We ask that you follow these simple rules to allow us to keep our forums open to all that may want to post. We ask that you respect the purpose of the forum and do not act in any way that harasses or personally attacks an individual or group of individuals. We also insist that you act in a manner that ensures a high quality of discussion in the stated purpose of the message board.

Thank you and please read on.



Forum Rules, College Golf Camps Forums 
In order to facilitate the free and respectful exchange of opinions about all things golf, the following rules must be observed. PLEASE READ THESE RULES CAREFULLY. Failure to comply with any rule may result in loss of privileges.

We expressly reserve the right to deny authorization to any person at any time, for any reason, as well as to delete in its entirety any post or link to material which we, in our sole discretion, deem to be:

  • offensive to the sensibilities of ordinary persons,
  • contrary to the rules or purpose of this website,
  • or which might subject us to legal liability.

Posters will be expected to maintain basic courtesy toward the opinions of others. Please avoid negativity and stay positive, everyone is entitled to an opinion.

We expect members to agree or disagree in a civil manner. Personal attacks will not be tolerated.

No Spam or posts containing Advertising are allowed without the express permission of the publishers of the Forum Boards (Ask the Board Admin for information).

The use of profanity will not be tolerated. Posts containing inappropriate language will be removed.

The use of HTML code (where allowed) in posts should be limited to golf related links. Please avoid lengthy files.

For performance reasons, please limit any graphics to which you post links to images 100K or less in size. If you’re not sure, don’t post it!

Under no circumstances will any graphics or links to pornographic, racially offensive or any other offensive material be permitted.

Please refrain from posting using ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. Capital letters are great for emphasis, but it is annoying to read posts that are all caps. Even posts that are almost all caps may be removed without warning.


If you have nothing constructive to provide on a forum (determined by any of the Board Administrators) your posts can be removed without warning. If you continue to make posts that offend any person or group, you may be banned. Further abuses or violation of these terms and conditions will result in an “abuse report” being filed with the offending parties ISP.

College Golf Camps Forum is intended to be an “Idea and Information” exchange, to help anyone involved in junior golf.

Enjoy the College Golf Camps Forums

Ask questions, seek advice, it’s FREE information for junior golfers, parents, coaches, everyone!!

We have created a community of people through our junior golf camps that we are very proud of.  We have so many visitors asking great questions.  Here, we provide a stage for FREE information, advice and opinions, share joys and 3 putts, don’t mention the word shank.  Most importantly, we want you to  interact with other junior golfers, parents, coaches, instructors, etc.  College Golf Camps Forum 

Who are these regular visitors? Some are junior golfers or parents of junior golfers or coaches or whoever.  Some are experts in a field of study such as mental training, fitness, swing mechanics, etc 

Ask questions, volunteer advice, talk about your experiences … Anything related to golf….kind of like standing on a driving range…..

We ask that you take a minute to read the forum rules and etiquette.

What are the Forum Rules? College Golf Camps Forums 

We ask that you follow these simple rules to allow us to keep our forums open to all that may want to post. We ask that you respect the purpose of the forum and do not act in any way that harasses or personally attacks an individual or group of individuals. We also insist that you act in a manner that ensures a high quality of discussion in the stated purpose of the message board.

Thank you and please read on.



Forum Rules, College Golf Camps Forums 
In order to facilitate the free and respectful exchange of opinions about all things golf, the following rules must be observed. PLEASE READ THESE RULES CAREFULLY. Failure to comply with any rule may result in loss of privileges.

We expressly reserve the right to deny authorization to any person at any time, for any reason, as well as to delete in its entirety any post or link to material which we, in our sole discretion, deem to be:

  • offensive to the sensibilities of ordinary persons,
  • contrary to the rules or purpose of this website,
  • or which might subject us to legal liability.

Posters will be expected to maintain basic courtesy toward the opinions of others. Please avoid negativity and stay positive, everyone is entitled to an opinion.

We expect members to agree or disagree in a civil manner. Personal attacks will not be tolerated.

No Spam or posts containing Advertising are allowed without the express permission of the publishers of the Forum Boards (Ask the Board Admin for information).

The use of profanity will not be tolerated. Posts containing inappropriate language will be removed.

The use of HTML code (where allowed) in posts should be limited to golf related links. Please avoid lengthy files.

For performance reasons, please limit any graphics to which you post links to images 100K or less in size. If you’re not sure, don’t post it!

Under no circumstances will any graphics or links to pornographic, racially offensive or any other offensive material be permitted.

Please refrain from posting using ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. Capital letters are great for emphasis, but it is annoying to read posts that are all caps. Even posts that are almost all caps may be removed without warning.


If you have nothing constructive to provide on a forum (determined by any of the Board Administrators) your posts can be removed without warning. If you continue to make posts that offend any person or group, you may be banned. Further abuses or violation of these terms and conditions will result in an “abuse report” being filed with the offending parties ISP.

College Golf Camps Forum is intended to be an “Idea and Information” exchange, to help anyone involved in junior golf.

Enjoy the College Golf Camps Forums

Dr. Nick Molinaro – How to Enter the Flow State in Golf

Dr. Nick recently wrote a great article for womensgolf.com  Dr. Nick is a frequent guest speaker at College Golf Camps of America.  We love this article because simply explains how performance is not forced.  Enjoy the information from our friend Dr. Nick.

CGC Staff

How to Enter the Flow State in Golf

Sport psychologist, Dr. Nick Molinaro explains how the right pre-competition preparation can help golfers get into the ‘zone’ or ‘flow’ state to achieve their highest levels of performance.

One of the most frequent questions I am asked by golfers of all abilities, coaches and parents is how to enter the zone or flow state in golf. The profession of sports psychology has different opinions about the ability to enter this highest level of performance. Some believe it is random and more serendipity-like while others believe it can be experienced by effective decision making of selective attentional shifting. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a Hungarian Psychologist, noted in his study on Happiness:

“The best moments in our lives are not the passive, receptive, relaxing times…The best moments usually occur if a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile.” (1990, p. 3).

I believe that an athlete can proactively set the stage for entering “Flow” states by utilizing the model Csikszentmihalyi designed.

Every moment in practice and competition a golfer has the opportunity to choose where to place their attention. I will provide a more in-depth discussion in the future about how this system is employed so, for now, we will make it simple.

The golfer should identify a challenge they want to stretch themselves towards. It is not simply the number of fairway hits, coming through the ball, etc. It is the mental process that demands attention. Some great examples are remaining focused, relaxed and present prior to making contact with the ball. If the player has some basic skills in each of these areas than the challenge is to do it more effectively.

Using a scale of 1-10 for Focused Effort (FE) the player identifies the specific mental skill and assigns a challenge level to it for their FE target. Attaining the target score of FE as frequently as possible for the entire round would be the challenge. The targeted skill is to employ it with the target FE each time they hit a shot. For example, being focused, relaxed and present with an FE of 8. Initially, this may appear easy, but I can assure you, it will take lots of practice to do so.

Here is the model Csikszentmihalyi developed:

How to enter the flow state in golf

Note that:

  • low skills and low challenge produce APATHY;

  • high skills and low challenge produce BOREDOM;

  • low skills and high challenge produce ANXIETY; and

  • high skills and high challenge produce FLOW.

Setting up a Challenge-Skills Balance for each competition helps in reaching flow states. Refer to Process Goals from my previous article to familiarize yourself with them.

I highly recommend this exercise:  identify a process goal for the skills and FE on a scale of 1-10 for the Challenge. Be sure to construct the Challenge-Skills Balance before each of your competitions as well as for your practice sessions.

Flow State in Golf

Channing Hensley’s Pre-tournament and Practice Notes

I asked one of my very talented high school juniors, Channing Hensley, who has committed to UNC Wilmington, how she prepares for her competitions and practice sessions and she kindly provided the following notes.

1Tournament Play Preparation

  • When possible, always play a practice round to familiarize myself with the course layout and greens.
  • If not possible, do course research and map out via web and diagram into yardage book.
  • Go through each hole and visualize strategy based on hole layout, yardage and map strategy into the yardage book. Develop my game plan.
  • Do a hole-by-hole visualization and see myself playing the hole.
  • When playing the practice round, drop balls from various locations around each green to practice chipping/pitching. Do the same on the greens for putting.
  • Work on pre-shot routine (cadence and visualization) techniques.

2Preparation for Practice

  • Never practice without a plan or goal.
  • Write down objective for the day before arriving at the course.
  • All drills will have outcome based results that I can track to help create a similar to tournament fee.
  • Dedicate a certain amount of time for practice sessions and take breaks every 30 minutes to stay mentally sharp.
  • Place heavy emphasis on process and pre-shot routine and implement before each shot during practice.
  • Finally, and certainly not last, make it fun! Realize how much I enjoy the game and be thankful for the opportunity I have to play it.

More recommendations for pre-competition preparation to come in future articles.

I would love to hear from you about your ideas, comments or questions below.

Dr. Nick.


 

dr-nick-molinaro-womens-golfOur contributing writer in Sport Psychology, Dr. Nick Molinaro is a licensed psychologist with specialties in Counseling, Human Development, and Sport Psychology.

Although his clients have ranged from the NASCAR, NBA, NFL, USA Ski and Gymnastic Team members, he is mostly known for his work with golfers. Dr. Nick has worked with players on PGA, LPGA, Symetra, LET tours as well as collegiate players at some of America’s most prestigious colleges including Oregon, Notre Dame, U Arizona, and U Texas,

Dr. Nick is the Mental Coach for the Michael Breed Golf Academy at Trump Golf Links, Fiddler’s Elbow Golf Academy, NJ and is an Advisory Board Member on WorldJuniorGolf.com and the Fellowship for Christian Athletes. He is frequently a guest on The Golf Fix on The Golf Channel and the 19th Hole Weekend Edition on CBS Sport Radio.

Find out more about golf psychology at Dr. Nick’s website, and follow him online on Twitter and Facebook.

Dr. Nick Molinaro – How to Enter the Flow State in Golf

Dr. Nick recently wrote a great article for womensgolf.com  Dr. Nick is a frequent guest speaker at College Golf Camps of America.  We love this article because simply explains how performance is not forced.  Enjoy the information from our friend Dr. Nick.

CGC Staff

How to Enter the Flow State in Golf

Sport psychologist, Dr. Nick Molinaro explains how the right pre-competition preparation can help golfers get into the ‘zone’ or ‘flow’ state to achieve their highest levels of performance.

One of the most frequent questions I am asked by golfers of all abilities, coaches and parents is how to enter the zone or flow state in golf. The profession of sports psychology has different opinions about the ability to enter this highest level of performance. Some believe it is random and more serendipity-like while others believe it can be experienced by effective decision making of selective attentional shifting. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a Hungarian Psychologist, noted in his study on Happiness:

“The best moments in our lives are not the passive, receptive, relaxing times…The best moments usually occur if a person’s body or mind is stretched to its limits in a voluntary effort to accomplish something difficult and worthwhile.” (1990, p. 3).

I believe that an athlete can proactively set the stage for entering “Flow” states by utilizing the model Csikszentmihalyi designed.

Every moment in practice and competition a golfer has the opportunity to choose where to place their attention. I will provide a more in-depth discussion in the future about how this system is employed so, for now, we will make it simple.

The golfer should identify a challenge they want to stretch themselves towards. It is not simply the number of fairway hits, coming through the ball, etc. It is the mental process that demands attention. Some great examples are remaining focused, relaxed and present prior to making contact with the ball. If the player has some basic skills in each of these areas than the challenge is to do it more effectively.

Using a scale of 1-10 for Focused Effort (FE) the player identifies the specific mental skill and assigns a challenge level to it for their FE target. Attaining the target score of FE as frequently as possible for the entire round would be the challenge. The targeted skill is to employ it with the target FE each time they hit a shot. For example, being focused, relaxed and present with an FE of 8. Initially, this may appear easy, but I can assure you, it will take lots of practice to do so.

Here is the model Csikszentmihalyi developed:

How to enter the flow state in golf

Note that:

  • low skills and low challenge produce APATHY;

  • high skills and low challenge produce BOREDOM;

  • low skills and high challenge produce ANXIETY; and

  • high skills and high challenge produce FLOW.

Setting up a Challenge-Skills Balance for each competition helps in reaching flow states. Refer to Process Goals from my previous article to familiarize yourself with them.

I highly recommend this exercise:  identify a process goal for the skills and FE on a scale of 1-10 for the Challenge. Be sure to construct the Challenge-Skills Balance before each of your competitions as well as for your practice sessions.

Flow State in Golf

Channing Hensley’s Pre-tournament and Practice Notes

I asked one of my very talented high school juniors, Channing Hensley, who has committed to UNC Wilmington, how she prepares for her competitions and practice sessions and she kindly provided the following notes.

1Tournament Play Preparation

  • When possible, always play a practice round to familiarize myself with the course layout and greens.
  • If not possible, do course research and map out via web and diagram into yardage book.
  • Go through each hole and visualize strategy based on hole layout, yardage and map strategy into the yardage book. Develop my game plan.
  • Do a hole-by-hole visualization and see myself playing the hole.
  • When playing the practice round, drop balls from various locations around each green to practice chipping/pitching. Do the same on the greens for putting.
  • Work on pre-shot routine (cadence and visualization) techniques.

2Preparation for Practice

  • Never practice without a plan or goal.
  • Write down objective for the day before arriving at the course.
  • All drills will have outcome based results that I can track to help create a similar to tournament fee.
  • Dedicate a certain amount of time for practice sessions and take breaks every 30 minutes to stay mentally sharp.
  • Place heavy emphasis on process and pre-shot routine and implement before each shot during practice.
  • Finally, and certainly not last, make it fun! Realize how much I enjoy the game and be thankful for the opportunity I have to play it.

More recommendations for pre-competition preparation to come in future articles.

I would love to hear from you about your ideas, comments or questions below.

Dr. Nick.


 

dr-nick-molinaro-womens-golfOur contributing writer in Sport Psychology, Dr. Nick Molinaro is a licensed psychologist with specialties in Counseling, Human Development, and Sport Psychology.

Although his clients have ranged from the NASCAR, NBA, NFL, USA Ski and Gymnastic Team members, he is mostly known for his work with golfers. Dr. Nick has worked with players on PGA, LPGA, Symetra, LET tours as well as collegiate players at some of America’s most prestigious colleges including Oregon, Notre Dame, U Arizona, and U Texas,

Dr. Nick is the Mental Coach for the Michael Breed Golf Academy at Trump Golf Links, Fiddler’s Elbow Golf Academy, NJ and is an Advisory Board Member on WorldJuniorGolf.com and the Fellowship for Christian Athletes. He is frequently a guest on The Golf Fix on The Golf Channel and the 19th Hole Weekend Edition on CBS Sport Radio.

Find out more about golf psychology at Dr. Nick’s website, and follow him online on Twitter and Facebook.

Four Guiding Principles for Golf Fitness Exercises

Golf fitness exercises help to keep vital golfing muscles in good shape, and this is important for preventing injury and being as on top of your golf game as you possibly can.

Remember that golf fitness exercises help to improve agility, endurance, flexibility, and overall strength and control, and junior golfers can use all of these golf fitness exercises as well.

Here are a few golf fitness exercises that you junior golfers should use to improve your golf game and keep your bodies in prime shape for competition.

Keep in mind that all golf fitness exercises should be done with the golf club in hand.

1- Core Muscles:

Stand with your golf club in front of you, one hand on each end of the club. With club in hand and arms apart, stretch the trunk in each direction until you feel the muscles stretch, but not so far or so hard that you feel pain. This exercise will helps to keep the muscles in your sides, back, and abdominal limber in good form.

2- Legs:

As with other golf fitness exercises, leg warm ups are also done with the golf club in hand. Not only will it provide a good deal of balance in this instance, but it also allows for support in precarious leg exercises. With the golf club in hand, you should perform toe touches and squats.

3- Lateral Muscles:

While you still use your club for support on this exercise, it is done a bit differently. Hold your golf club above your head with your arms shoulder length apart. Bend the body from right to left until you feel enough of a stretch in each area for that to be satisfying. Don’t overdo it, as lateral muscle strain can really be a pain the next day.

4- Shoulders:

Shoulders are an important area for golf fitness, but exercises can be done with ease. One of the easiest ways of exercising this part is to put your golf club behind your shoulders with one hand and reach back with the other. This will cause the shoulders to stretch in the right places, and you can easily tell when the stretch is getting to be too much, so take care not to overdo it.

Always keep in mind that the body needs to go through rest, recovery and regeneration in order to develop properly. So, we should always allow some time for our body to relax between tow exercises.

http://www.junior-golf-guide.com/golf-fitness-exsercises.html

“Golf Fitness Exsercises.” Golf Fitness Exsercises. Copyright © 2006-2007 Junior-golf-guide, n.d. Web. 08 Nov. 2016.

Four Guiding Principles for Golf Fitness Exercises

Golf fitness exercises help to keep vital golfing muscles in good shape, and this is important for preventing injury and being as on top of your golf game as you possibly can.

Remember that golf fitness exercises help to improve agility, endurance, flexibility, and overall strength and control, and junior golfers can use all of these golf fitness exercises as well.

Here are a few golf fitness exercises that you junior golfers should use to improve your golf game and keep your bodies in prime shape for competition.

Keep in mind that all golf fitness exercises should be done with the golf club in hand.

1- Core Muscles:

Stand with your golf club in front of you, one hand on each end of the club. With club in hand and arms apart, stretch the trunk in each direction until you feel the muscles stretch, but not so far or so hard that you feel pain. This exercise will helps to keep the muscles in your sides, back, and abdominal limber in good form.

2- Legs:

As with other golf fitness exercises, leg warm ups are also done with the golf club in hand. Not only will it provide a good deal of balance in this instance, but it also allows for support in precarious leg exercises. With the golf club in hand, you should perform toe touches and squats.

3- Lateral Muscles:

While you still use your club for support on this exercise, it is done a bit differently. Hold your golf club above your head with your arms shoulder length apart. Bend the body from right to left until you feel enough of a stretch in each area for that to be satisfying. Don’t overdo it, as lateral muscle strain can really be a pain the next day.

4- Shoulders:

Shoulders are an important area for golf fitness, but exercises can be done with ease. One of the easiest ways of exercising this part is to put your golf club behind your shoulders with one hand and reach back with the other. This will cause the shoulders to stretch in the right places, and you can easily tell when the stretch is getting to be too much, so take care not to overdo it.

Always keep in mind that the body needs to go through rest, recovery and regeneration in order to develop properly. So, we should always allow some time for our body to relax between tow exercises.

http://www.junior-golf-guide.com/golf-fitness-exsercises.html

“Golf Fitness Exsercises.” Golf Fitness Exsercises. Copyright © 2006-2007 Junior-golf-guide, n.d. Web. 08 Nov. 2016.

Nutrition Tips with Rika Park

Golf Nutrition Tips for Junior Golfers

A healthy diet is an important factor for achieving peak athletic performance, especially for junior golfers.  In this article Rika Park, IJGA Strength and Conditioning Coach, gives some quick tips for a well-balanced diet.

Golf Wellness & Health Information

1. Be sure to consume enough energy (calories) every day. Low energy intake can result in:

  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Menstrual dysfunction
  • Loss of bone density
  • Increased risk of injury, fatigue and illness
  • Prolonged recovery process

2. Carbohydrates

  • Should consume 2.7-4.5 grams of carbs per pound of body weight
  • That’s 6-10 grams of carbs per kilogram of body weight for our international friends
  • Carbohydrates maintain blood glucose level during exercise and replace muscle glycogen

3. Protein

  • Should consume 0.5-0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight
  • That’s 1.2-1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight
  • Protein intake is usually met by the daily diet alone
  • Very important for tissue repairing process

4. Fat

  • Should account for around 20-35% of total caloric intake
  • Consuming less than 20% of total diet does not benefit performance
  • Is a source of energy
  • Fat soluble vitamins and essential fat are important for athletes
  • A high-fat diet is not recommended

Golfers Diet Tips by Rika Park

About Rika: A native of Japan, Rika Park came to the United States when she was 14 years old. An IJGA alum, Rika trained at the International Junior Golf Academy for four-and-a-half years. She played NCAA DI golf at the University of Miami, where she majored in Exercise Physiology and minored in Sports Medicine. Rika is TPI Level 2 Certified. She can be reached at rika.park@hub.media/ijga.

-@ijga_. “Nutrition Tips from Rika Park – IJGA.” International Junior Golf Academy IJGA. International Junior Golf Academy, 01 July 2016. Web. 21 Oct. 2016.

 

Nutrition Tips with Rika Park

Golf Nutrition Tips for Junior Golfers

A healthy diet is an important factor for achieving peak athletic performance, especially for junior golfers.  In this article Rika Park, IJGA Strength and Conditioning Coach, gives some quick tips for a well-balanced diet.

Golf Wellness & Health Information

1. Be sure to consume enough energy (calories) every day. Low energy intake can result in:

  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Menstrual dysfunction
  • Loss of bone density
  • Increased risk of injury, fatigue and illness
  • Prolonged recovery process

2. Carbohydrates

  • Should consume 2.7-4.5 grams of carbs per pound of body weight
  • That’s 6-10 grams of carbs per kilogram of body weight for our international friends
  • Carbohydrates maintain blood glucose level during exercise and replace muscle glycogen

3. Protein

  • Should consume 0.5-0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight
  • That’s 1.2-1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight
  • Protein intake is usually met by the daily diet alone
  • Very important for tissue repairing process

4. Fat

  • Should account for around 20-35% of total caloric intake
  • Consuming less than 20% of total diet does not benefit performance
  • Is a source of energy
  • Fat soluble vitamins and essential fat are important for athletes
  • A high-fat diet is not recommended

Golfers Diet Tips by Rika Park

About Rika: A native of Japan, Rika Park came to the United States when she was 14 years old. An IJGA alum, Rika trained at the International Junior Golf Academy for four-and-a-half years. She played NCAA DI golf at the University of Miami, where she majored in Exercise Physiology and minored in Sports Medicine. Rika is TPI Level 2 Certified. She can be reached at rika.park@hub.media/ijga.

-@ijga_. “Nutrition Tips from Rika Park – IJGA.” International Junior Golf Academy IJGA. International Junior Golf Academy, 01 July 2016. Web. 21 Oct. 2016.

 

Winter Golf Workouts

As winter is quickly approaching, Interlachen Director of Instruction Luke Benoit, provides some workout tips that help junior golfers over the winter months.

Build Swing Speed

“My number one recommendation to almost all juniors is to pick up clubhead speed by simply swinging a club every day,” reports Luke. “No need to even hit balls, just swing as fast as you can! Twenty hard swings every day will help you build up clubhead speed quickly.” Benoit trains numerous high school and college golfers during the winter and tailors exercise plans based on the unique attributes of each individual person. Athletes who play other sports have different exercise needs than those that just play golf, for example.

Offseason Training

Benoit also likes to create custom training programs based on what a golfer’s game and swing need. “For instance, if you’re already pretty strong, it might make sense to work more on flexibility than strength,” he says. “If you’re skinny and flexible, then you probably need to start adding some serious strength to your frame.” Benoit says the best plan is to find a golf fitness instructor who can create a workout specifically for you.

Weight Work

In a general sense, Benoit recommends integrating full body weight exercise like planks, push-ups, pull-ups and medicine ball tosses into any training plan. He says more often than not, discipline to keep the routine going is the biggest problem for most junior golfers. “My recommendation is to start small with an accomplishable goal of 20-minute workouts 3-4 days per week,” he suggests. “If you can keep that up for a month and want more, find a fitness pro that can develop a customized plan and get serious about it.”

Benoit is also on the staff at the Minnesota Golf Academy in Eden Prairie, which offers group workout classes every Saturday to help make fitness fun. He says there are many such programs around the state – just ask your coach or local Section Professional for more information.

That’s advice that all of us can use as we get ready for the 2017 season.

-Overson, Brian. “Winter Golf Workouts For Junior Golfers.” |. N.p., 28 Jan. 2015. Web. 13 Oct. 2016.

Winter Golf Workouts

As winter is quickly approaching, Interlachen Director of Instruction Luke Benoit, provides some workout tips that help junior golfers over the winter months.

Build Swing Speed

“My number one recommendation to almost all juniors is to pick up clubhead speed by simply swinging a club every day,” reports Luke. “No need to even hit balls, just swing as fast as you can! Twenty hard swings every day will help you build up clubhead speed quickly.” Benoit trains numerous high school and college golfers during the winter and tailors exercise plans based on the unique attributes of each individual person. Athletes who play other sports have different exercise needs than those that just play golf, for example.

Offseason Training

Benoit also likes to create custom training programs based on what a golfer’s game and swing need. “For instance, if you’re already pretty strong, it might make sense to work more on flexibility than strength,” he says. “If you’re skinny and flexible, then you probably need to start adding some serious strength to your frame.” Benoit says the best plan is to find a golf fitness instructor who can create a workout specifically for you.

Weight Work

In a general sense, Benoit recommends integrating full body weight exercise like planks, push-ups, pull-ups and medicine ball tosses into any training plan. He says more often than not, discipline to keep the routine going is the biggest problem for most junior golfers. “My recommendation is to start small with an accomplishable goal of 20-minute workouts 3-4 days per week,” he suggests. “If you can keep that up for a month and want more, find a fitness pro that can develop a customized plan and get serious about it.”

Benoit is also on the staff at the Minnesota Golf Academy in Eden Prairie, which offers group workout classes every Saturday to help make fitness fun. He says there are many such programs around the state – just ask your coach or local Section Professional for more information.

That’s advice that all of us can use as we get ready for the 2017 season.

-Overson, Brian. “Winter Golf Workouts For Junior Golfers.” |. N.p., 28 Jan. 2015. Web. 13 Oct. 2016.

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