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Faldo Series partners with IJGA

 

Faldo Series appoints IJGA as

Official Golf Academy Partner

Sir Nick Faldo (left), founder of the Faldo Series, and Ryley Hendry (right), CEO of the International Junior Golf Academy (IJGA), following the appointment of IJGA as the Official Golf Academy Partner of the Faldo Series.
The Faldo Series, the global circuit of junior events created by six-time Major winner Sir Nick Faldo, has appointed the International Junior Golf Academy (IJGA) as its Official Golf Academy Partner.

“I am personally excited to appoint IJGA as the Official Golf Academy Partner of the Faldo Series, as it feels like the proper addition to the guidance offered by the Series. It offers our junior players from around the world a first-class academy to further their golf journey and education. It also provides expertise in the process or opportunity to play college golf in America,” said Faldo.

Ryley Hendry, CEO of IJGA, said: “The International Junior Golf Academy is proud to become an Official Partner of the Faldo Series, the premier global circuit for young golfers. This new partnership underlines IJGA’s reputation as one of the world’s leading junior academies for aspiring golfers from across the globe. We look forward to counseling student-athletes on US golf academies and the college scholarship system in the US as we work with the Faldo Series.”

To read the full story, click here.

For more information about this exciting announcement, please contact:

Matt Bashaw at 843-816-0930 or matt.bashaw@ijga.com or

Patrick O’Toole at 843-384-1141 or patrick.otoole@ijga.com

 

Faldo Series partners with IJGA

 

Faldo Series appoints IJGA as

Official Golf Academy Partner

Sir Nick Faldo (left), founder of the Faldo Series, and Ryley Hendry (right), CEO of the International Junior Golf Academy (IJGA), following the appointment of IJGA as the Official Golf Academy Partner of the Faldo Series.
The Faldo Series, the global circuit of junior events created by six-time Major winner Sir Nick Faldo, has appointed the International Junior Golf Academy (IJGA) as its Official Golf Academy Partner.

“I am personally excited to appoint IJGA as the Official Golf Academy Partner of the Faldo Series, as it feels like the proper addition to the guidance offered by the Series. It offers our junior players from around the world a first-class academy to further their golf journey and education. It also provides expertise in the process or opportunity to play college golf in America,” said Faldo.

Ryley Hendry, CEO of IJGA, said: “The International Junior Golf Academy is proud to become an Official Partner of the Faldo Series, the premier global circuit for young golfers. This new partnership underlines IJGA’s reputation as one of the world’s leading junior academies for aspiring golfers from across the globe. We look forward to counseling student-athletes on US golf academies and the college scholarship system in the US as we work with the Faldo Series.”

To read the full story, click here.

For more information about this exciting announcement, please contact:

Matt Bashaw at 843-816-0930 or matt.bashaw@ijga.com or

Patrick O’Toole at 843-384-1141 or patrick.otoole@ijga.com

 

College Golf Camps Alumni Making an Impact in College Golf

*UPDATED 3/31/16

What are College Golf Camps alumni doing now? Congratulations to all!!

University of Oklahoma’s Ana Ruiz is one of many College Golf Camp alumni making an impact in College Golf.

Ana is from Chihuahua, Mexico. She is currently a sophomore at Oklahoma. Her personal low 18 hole score in college is 70, which she has shot 3 times including the NCAA San Antonio Regional last Spring. Read more

Blaine Hale, Dallas, Texas, Freshman, University of Oklahoma, Read more

Brad Dalke, Hobart, Oklahoma, Freshman, University of Oklahoma, Read more

Tanner Gore, El Paso, Texas, University of Texas, Arlington, Read more

Andrew Priest, Houston, Texas, University of Texas, Read more

Gaby Amos, Gainesville, Florida, Freshman, University of South Carolina, Read More

Camilo Avia, Bogota, Columbia, Freshman, University of Texas, Arlington, Read more

Sam Schwartz, San Clemente, California, Freshman, University of Hawaii, Read more

Grant Booth, Sydney, Australia, Sophomore, University of Nevada, Read more

Pablo Matesanz, Irun, Spain, Sophomore, San Diego State University, Read more

Kavan Canekeratne, Southborough, MA, Sophomore, University of San Diego, Read more

Ashley Lonergan – Scottsdale, AZ – University of Nebraska

Clayton Feagler, Laguna Niguel, CA – Pepperdine University

Noah Steele – Canada – Sam Houston State University

Sam Warkentin – Bainbridge Island, WA – University of Washington

Vickie Kwak, Tallahassee, Florida, Freshman, Oglethorpe University, Read more

Austin Cotton, Austin, Texas is currently a Freshman at Baylor University, read more

Zac McCurday, Jacksonville State University

Derek Ackerman, University of Santa Clara

Connor Alexander, High Point University

Charles Wang, Northwestern University

Marra Burton, Furman University

Makena Mucciaccio, Central Oklahoma University

Brennan LeBlanc, Lynn University

Errol Clarke, Virginia Commonwealth

Dylan Deogun, Mercer University

Jacob Appleby, Marshall University

Travis McInroe, Baylor University

Hannah Valentine, McNeese State University

Mason Weld, Sam Houston State University

Maddie Zack, Oakland University

Jake Hendrix, University of New Mexico

Logan Smoak, Southern Nazarene University

Ryan Graf, Simon Fraser University

Sterling Smith, Washington & Lee University

Tyler Dierwechter, Stetson Universit, Read More

Trey Wren, Temple University

Lee Hammerschmidt, Lehigh University

Aaron Walker, Samford University

Gavin Hogan, Furman University

Sam Warkentin, University of Washington

Kaho-Monica Matsubara, Singapore, Freshman, Northwestern University, Read more

Hays Moreland, Memphis, Tennessee, Freshman, University of Cincinnati, Read more

Turner MacLean, Ft. Worth, Texas, Freshman, Texas Christian University, Read more

Tate Smith, Stetson University, Read More

Coleman Houston, Midland College

Matt Corio, New Mexico State University

Mateusz Kucz – Poznan, Poland, Sophomore, University of California, San Diego, Read more

Myla Brown, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Minnesota State, Read more

Chris Koza, Tallmadge, Ohio, Malone University, Read more

Ethan Smith, Edmond, Oklahoma, Oklahoma Christian University, Read More

Cody Troutman, Edmond Oklahoma, Central Oklahoma University, Read more

Casey Paul, Owasso, Oklahoma, Northeastern State University, Read more

Josh Rinehart, York, PA, Penn State, Read more

Michael Duch, Aberdeen, SD, South Dakota State University, Read more

Chase Ambrose, Houston, Texas, Texas State University

Lindsay Bain, Wylie, Texas, Centenary University, Read More

Quincy Ballard, Aledo, Texas, DePauw University, Read More

Jesse Bratz, Colleyville, Texas, UC Davis, Read more

Taylor Chaffin, McKinney, Texas, University of North Texas, Read More

Aramina Flores Corpus Christi, Texas, William Penn University, Read more

Nicolas Vanegas, Bogota, Colombia, Jacksonville State University, Read more

Alexander Goodman, Polk City, Florida, West Virginia University, Read more

Levi Grogan, Canton, NC, Mars Hill University, Read more

Luke Groan, Canton, NC, Mars Hill University, Read more

Kaitlyn Ellis, La Quinta, CA, Fresno State University, Read more

Ellen Takada, Irvine, CA, University of Washington

Devyn Solano, Aurora, CO, Oral Roberts University, Read more

Ryan Hicks, Santa Monica, CA, Loyola University, Read more

Michael Boylan, Patterson, NY, Denver University, Read more

Jake Quast, Ashland, OR, Dominican University, Read more

Michael Perez, Sacramento, CA, Saint Xavier University, Read more

Elijah Pittser, Huntington Beach, CA Whitworth University, Read more

Adrian Lee, Sydney, Australia, University of Hawaii, Read more

Jordan McBrayer, Carlsbad, CA, Regis University,

Nick Rivera, Seaside, CA, Dominican University, Read more

Sera Tadokoro, Hilton Head, SC, University of Central Florida

Brent Rodgers, Cranberry Township, PA, Robert Morris University, Read more

Cake Phuchanbanchob, Thailand, California State Northridge, Read more

Erica Olberding, Iowa, UNC – Ashville

Allison, Iowa, William & Mary University

Kika Dzoan – Tracy, CA, MSU – Denver

Samantha Bennett – Wake Forest, NC, Limestone College

Jasmine Chee – China, Western Michigan University

Katie Kirkhardt – Oklahoma, Oral Roberts University

Aaron Tobin – Temple University

David Choi – Babson College

We are working through this massive list, please check back, we update this page as frequently as possible

If you have an update on a CGC Alumni please email us juniorgolf @ collegegolfcamps.com

College Golf Camps Alumni Making an Impact in College Golf

*UPDATED 3/31/16

What are College Golf Camps alumni doing now? Congratulations to all!!

University of Oklahoma’s Ana Ruiz is one of many College Golf Camp alumni making an impact in College Golf.

Ana is from Chihuahua, Mexico. She is currently a sophomore at Oklahoma. Her personal low 18 hole score in college is 70, which she has shot 3 times including the NCAA San Antonio Regional last Spring. Read more

Blaine Hale, Dallas, Texas, Freshman, University of Oklahoma, Read more

Brad Dalke, Hobart, Oklahoma, Freshman, University of Oklahoma, Read more

Tanner Gore, El Paso, Texas, University of Texas, Arlington, Read more

Andrew Priest, Houston, Texas, University of Texas, Read more

Gaby Amos, Gainesville, Florida, Freshman, University of South Carolina, Read More

Camilo Avia, Bogota, Columbia, Freshman, University of Texas, Arlington, Read more

Sam Schwartz, San Clemente, California, Freshman, University of Hawaii, Read more

Grant Booth, Sydney, Australia, Sophomore, University of Nevada, Read more

Pablo Matesanz, Irun, Spain, Sophomore, San Diego State University, Read more

Kavan Canekeratne, Southborough, MA, Sophomore, University of San Diego, Read more

Ashley Lonergan – Scottsdale, AZ – University of Nebraska

Clayton Feagler, Laguna Niguel, CA – Pepperdine University

Noah Steele – Canada – Sam Houston State University

Sam Warkentin – Bainbridge Island, WA – University of Washington

Vickie Kwak, Tallahassee, Florida, Freshman, Oglethorpe University, Read more

Austin Cotton, Austin, Texas is currently a Freshman at Baylor University, read more

Zac McCurday, Jacksonville State University

Derek Ackerman, University of Santa Clara

Connor Alexander, High Point University

Charles Wang, Northwestern University

Marra Burton, Furman University

Makena Mucciaccio, Central Oklahoma University

Brennan LeBlanc, Lynn University

Errol Clarke, Virginia Commonwealth

Dylan Deogun, Mercer University

Jacob Appleby, Marshall University

Travis McInroe, Baylor University

Hannah Valentine, McNeese State University

Mason Weld, Sam Houston State University

Maddie Zack, Oakland University

Jake Hendrix, University of New Mexico

Logan Smoak, Southern Nazarene University

Ryan Graf, Simon Fraser University

Sterling Smith, Washington & Lee University

Tyler Dierwechter, Stetson Universit, Read More

Trey Wren, Temple University

Lee Hammerschmidt, Lehigh University

Aaron Walker, Samford University

Gavin Hogan, Furman University

Sam Warkentin, University of Washington

Kaho-Monica Matsubara, Singapore, Freshman, Northwestern University, Read more

Hays Moreland, Memphis, Tennessee, Freshman, University of Cincinnati, Read more

Turner MacLean, Ft. Worth, Texas, Freshman, Texas Christian University, Read more

Tate Smith, Stetson University, Read More

Coleman Houston, Midland College

Matt Corio, New Mexico State University

Mateusz Kucz – Poznan, Poland, Sophomore, University of California, San Diego, Read more

Myla Brown, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Minnesota State, Read more

Chris Koza, Tallmadge, Ohio, Malone University, Read more

Ethan Smith, Edmond, Oklahoma, Oklahoma Christian University, Read More

Cody Troutman, Edmond Oklahoma, Central Oklahoma University, Read more

Casey Paul, Owasso, Oklahoma, Northeastern State University, Read more

Josh Rinehart, York, PA, Penn State, Read more

Michael Duch, Aberdeen, SD, South Dakota State University, Read more

Chase Ambrose, Houston, Texas, Texas State University

Lindsay Bain, Wylie, Texas, Centenary University, Read More

Quincy Ballard, Aledo, Texas, DePauw University, Read More

Jesse Bratz, Colleyville, Texas, UC Davis, Read more

Taylor Chaffin, McKinney, Texas, University of North Texas, Read More

Aramina Flores Corpus Christi, Texas, William Penn University, Read more

Nicolas Vanegas, Bogota, Colombia, Jacksonville State University, Read more

Alexander Goodman, Polk City, Florida, West Virginia University, Read more

Levi Grogan, Canton, NC, Mars Hill University, Read more

Luke Groan, Canton, NC, Mars Hill University, Read more

Kaitlyn Ellis, La Quinta, CA, Fresno State University, Read more

Ellen Takada, Irvine, CA, University of Washington

Devyn Solano, Aurora, CO, Oral Roberts University, Read more

Ryan Hicks, Santa Monica, CA, Loyola University, Read more

Michael Boylan, Patterson, NY, Denver University, Read more

Jake Quast, Ashland, OR, Dominican University, Read more

Michael Perez, Sacramento, CA, Saint Xavier University, Read more

Elijah Pittser, Huntington Beach, CA Whitworth University, Read more

Adrian Lee, Sydney, Australia, University of Hawaii, Read more

Jordan McBrayer, Carlsbad, CA, Regis University,

Nick Rivera, Seaside, CA, Dominican University, Read more

Sera Tadokoro, Hilton Head, SC, University of Central Florida

Brent Rodgers, Cranberry Township, PA, Robert Morris University, Read more

Cake Phuchanbanchob, Thailand, California State Northridge, Read more

Erica Olberding, Iowa, UNC – Ashville

Allison, Iowa, William & Mary University

Kika Dzoan – Tracy, CA, MSU – Denver

Samantha Bennett – Wake Forest, NC, Limestone College

Jasmine Chee – China, Western Michigan University

Katie Kirkhardt – Oklahoma, Oral Roberts University

Aaron Tobin – Temple University

David Choi – Babson College

We are working through this massive list, please check back, we update this page as frequently as possible

If you have an update on a CGC Alumni please email us juniorgolf @ collegegolfcamps.com

College Golf Camps – Junior Golfer Parent Reviews

Parents Review College Golf Camps

At College Golf Camps, we know how important it is to a parent to help your children succeed. For any parent with a junior golfer considering playing collegiate golf and possibly beyond, CGC gives junior golfers a unique experience, the chance to learn from college golf coaches with the goal of improving as a golfer. Our camps give your junior golfer an one of a kind interaction with top college golf coaches. Preparing your child for the collegiate golf path doesn’t have to be a mystery. Our college golf coaches instruct, evaluate and interact with junior golfers from all over the world.

Parents, College Golf Camps can provide your student athlete the chance to play in front of college golf coaches and learn about the college golf experience, whether or not they are thinking about playing golf in college.

Our camps provide the important college golf experience for any aspiring junior golfer seeking to display his/her skills in front of collegiate coaches. Our campers learn and gain collegiate golf experience, they have a blast doing it! Want to hear what other parents have to say about College Golf Camps below:

College Golf Camps – Junior Golfer Parent Reviews

Parents Review College Golf Camps

At College Golf Camps, we know how important it is to a parent to help your children succeed. For any parent with a junior golfer considering playing collegiate golf and possibly beyond, CGC gives junior golfers a unique experience, the chance to learn from college golf coaches with the goal of improving as a golfer. Our camps give your junior golfer an one of a kind interaction with top college golf coaches. Preparing your child for the collegiate golf path doesn’t have to be a mystery. Our college golf coaches instruct, evaluate and interact with junior golfers from all over the world.

Parents, College Golf Camps can provide your student athlete the chance to play in front of college golf coaches and learn about the college golf experience, whether or not they are thinking about playing golf in college.

Our camps provide the important college golf experience for any aspiring junior golfer seeking to display his/her skills in front of collegiate coaches. Our campers learn and gain collegiate golf experience, they have a blast doing it! Want to hear what other parents have to say about College Golf Camps below:

College Golf Camps – Junior Golf Player/Camper Reviews

Junior Golfer/Camper Review Their College Golf Camps Experiences

With College Golf Camps, junior golfers get the unique experience to learn from college golf coaches with the goal of improving as a golfer. CGC allows college golf coaches to instruct, evaluate and interact with junior golfers from all over the world. College Golf Camps provides any student athletes thinking about playing college golf the chance to play in front of college golf coaches and learn about the college golf experience.

And our camps provide the important college golf experience for any aspiring junior golfer. For any junior golfer seeking to display his/her skills in front of collegiate coaches as well as learning how to best prepare for a collegiate golf career, this is your camp! And not only do our campers learn and gain collegiate golf experience, they have a blast doing it! Check out what our junior golf campers have to say about their time at College Golf Camps below:

College Golf Camps – Junior Golf Player/Camper Reviews

Junior Golfer/Camper Review Their College Golf Camps Experiences

With College Golf Camps, junior golfers get the unique experience to learn from college golf coaches with the goal of improving as a golfer. CGC allows college golf coaches to instruct, evaluate and interact with junior golfers from all over the world. College Golf Camps provides any student athletes thinking about playing college golf the chance to play in front of college golf coaches and learn about the college golf experience.

And our camps provide the important college golf experience for any aspiring junior golfer. For any junior golfer seeking to display his/her skills in front of collegiate coaches as well as learning how to best prepare for a collegiate golf career, this is your camp! And not only do our campers learn and gain collegiate golf experience, they have a blast doing it! Check out what our junior golf campers have to say about their time at College Golf Camps below:

Creating Well Rounded Junior Golfers

Cordie Walker with Golf Science Lab is joined by Bhrett McCabe, PhD.

Bhrett McCabe, PhD is a performance and sports psychologist that has worked extensively across a variety of settings and athletic groups through his company, The MindSide, LLC. Dr. McCabe has a diverse background of working in the pharmaceutical industry in clinical trial research and education prior to returning to his academic and professional training as a clinical and sports psychologist.

The important thing is early diversity and the early exposure to other sports that teach kids how to sit on the bench and realize that maybe you are not the superstar. And if you are not the superstar, can you be a role player? Can you be the guy that goes into a basketball game and only gets to play a third of the minutes, but you can learn how to play defense and maybe score two points?

The amazing thing about sports is that everybody is on a different maturation schedule and the guy or the girl who is four inches taller and stronger, who grew early may not grow last.

We have to start developing the psychological resiliency, communication skills, and how to deal with failures in juniors. For juniors that play other sports there is a benefit to playing with kids that are better than you, there is also a benefit of playing with kids that are not as good as you we have to allow for as many experiences as possible.
Failure Drills

It’s important to put an athlete through drills that forces them to not succeed and see how they deal with failure. We’re looking for players that go, “That drill that we did, kicked my butt, when are we doing it again? I’m going to get it this time” versus, “I don’t want to do that drill ever again because it made me lose my confidence.”

A drill can’t make you lose your confidence unless you chose to allow that drill to make you lose your confidence.

We have a putting drill that I do that is really hard called the ‘The Closer’ which is eight stations from five feet away around the hole and you have to make 24 in a row to win it, all from five feet or you have to start over.

The average completion time is over an hour-and-a-half the first time because the nerves start kicking in and the last putts are hard to make.

It’s a failure drill, you are going to fail at it, but can you handle the failure in order and put it in the back of your mind to focus on the success?

Keep Reading, Click here

Creating Well Rounded Junior Golfers

Cordie Walker with Golf Science Lab is joined by Bhrett McCabe, PhD.

Bhrett McCabe, PhD is a performance and sports psychologist that has worked extensively across a variety of settings and athletic groups through his company, The MindSide, LLC. Dr. McCabe has a diverse background of working in the pharmaceutical industry in clinical trial research and education prior to returning to his academic and professional training as a clinical and sports psychologist.

The important thing is early diversity and the early exposure to other sports that teach kids how to sit on the bench and realize that maybe you are not the superstar. And if you are not the superstar, can you be a role player? Can you be the guy that goes into a basketball game and only gets to play a third of the minutes, but you can learn how to play defense and maybe score two points?

The amazing thing about sports is that everybody is on a different maturation schedule and the guy or the girl who is four inches taller and stronger, who grew early may not grow last.

We have to start developing the psychological resiliency, communication skills, and how to deal with failures in juniors. For juniors that play other sports there is a benefit to playing with kids that are better than you, there is also a benefit of playing with kids that are not as good as you we have to allow for as many experiences as possible.
Failure Drills

It’s important to put an athlete through drills that forces them to not succeed and see how they deal with failure. We’re looking for players that go, “That drill that we did, kicked my butt, when are we doing it again? I’m going to get it this time” versus, “I don’t want to do that drill ever again because it made me lose my confidence.”

A drill can’t make you lose your confidence unless you chose to allow that drill to make you lose your confidence.

We have a putting drill that I do that is really hard called the ‘The Closer’ which is eight stations from five feet away around the hole and you have to make 24 in a row to win it, all from five feet or you have to start over.

The average completion time is over an hour-and-a-half the first time because the nerves start kicking in and the last putts are hard to make.

It’s a failure drill, you are going to fail at it, but can you handle the failure in order and put it in the back of your mind to focus on the success?

Keep Reading, Click here

Improve your focus, confidence and emotional management, TODAY!!

Do you want to improve focus, confidence and emotional management so that you are able to perform at your best when it counts the most? Of Course, you do, we all do!!

For a limited time, we are pleased to offer the TAIS Inventory test to measure your competitiveness, level of focus, confidence and emotional management. This is a world renown psychometric test that will compare your skills to Professional and top amateur golfers.

The Attentional & Interpersonal Style (TAIS) Inventory measures how individuals concentrate and behave. It is an inventory of style, not ability or intelligence. There are no right or wrong answers.

The TAIS Inventory consists of 144 items. Please allow approximately 45 minutes of uninterrupted time to complete the assessment.

Now, College Golf Camps™ is please to introduce Dr. Nick Molinaro of DrNickGolf.com , frequently seen on The Golf Channel’s The Golf Fix with Michael Breed and on SiriusXM PGATour Radio on A New Breed of Golf with Michael Breed.

Dr. Nick is the Mental Coach for the Michael Breed Golf Academy, Fiddler’s Elbow Golf and Tennis Academies. He also works with athlete in all sports from Juniors to World Class.

The evaluation will assess 20 mental skills used in your golf performance. Dr. Nick will make a detailed analysis and each golfer will receive a 30 min debriefing video customized for each player indicating strengths and areas that need to be improved with mental tips from him. The assessment will be administered on-line and will take approximately 20-30 min.

Follow-up sessions with Dr. Nick with on-line mental skills coaching and hands-on-club-on-course training can be arranged and customized for the player’s needs.

Dr. Nick is offering the same golf mental skills assessment package that he uses with all of his players on the PGA, Web.com, LPGA, Symetra, Champions’, etc.

Save over 55% off this amazing opportunity to learn….

If you would like to receive this test and learn how to improve the areas you need most, email nick at collegegolfcamps.com NOW

Improve your focus, confidence and emotional management, TODAY!!

Do you want to improve focus, confidence and emotional management so that you are able to perform at your best when it counts the most? Of Course, you do, we all do!!

For a limited time, we are pleased to offer the TAIS Inventory test to measure your competitiveness, level of focus, confidence and emotional management. This is a world renown psychometric test that will compare your skills to Professional and top amateur golfers.

The Attentional & Interpersonal Style (TAIS) Inventory measures how individuals concentrate and behave. It is an inventory of style, not ability or intelligence. There are no right or wrong answers.

The TAIS Inventory consists of 144 items. Please allow approximately 45 minutes of uninterrupted time to complete the assessment.

Now, College Golf Camps™ is please to introduce Dr. Nick Molinaro of DrNickGolf.com , frequently seen on The Golf Channel’s The Golf Fix with Michael Breed and on SiriusXM PGATour Radio on A New Breed of Golf with Michael Breed.

Dr. Nick is the Mental Coach for the Michael Breed Golf Academy, Fiddler’s Elbow Golf and Tennis Academies. He also works with athlete in all sports from Juniors to World Class.

The evaluation will assess 20 mental skills used in your golf performance. Dr. Nick will make a detailed analysis and each golfer will receive a 30 min debriefing video customized for each player indicating strengths and areas that need to be improved with mental tips from him. The assessment will be administered on-line and will take approximately 20-30 min.

Follow-up sessions with Dr. Nick with on-line mental skills coaching and hands-on-club-on-course training can be arranged and customized for the player’s needs.

Dr. Nick is offering the same golf mental skills assessment package that he uses with all of his players on the PGA, Web.com, LPGA, Symetra, Champions’, etc.

Save over 55% off this amazing opportunity to learn….

If you would like to receive this test and learn how to improve the areas you need most, email nick at collegegolfcamps.com NOW

5 More SAT Prep Tips For The 2016, Redesigned New SAT

5 More SAT Prep Tips For The 2016, Redesigned New SAT

Shaan Patel – 2400 Expert

There is a lot of trepidation around the New SAT. However, I have good news for you. The New SAT is easier than ever to prepare for. Here are 5 tips to help you prepare. You can also join my 6-week Online SAT Class that starts this weekend to learn 95 more strategies by enrolling here.

(1) SAT General Strategy – Follow the 1,000 Question Rule: To really excel, you should practice with 1,000 SAT questions. You should also review those 1,000 SAT questions. Just as critical as the practice itself is understanding why you got certain questions incorrect and what you can do next time to make sure you don’t get similar problems incorrect. The College Board only has a limited number of concepts and question types it can ask you on the SAT. If you practice and review 1,000 questions, you will be sufficiently prepared for test day.

(2) SAT Math Strategy: SAT – Substitute Abstract (with) Tangibles – To avoid doing algebra on the SAT, create your own numbers (tangibles) to plug in for variables (abstracts). This strategy is applicable to algebra, geometry, proportions, etc. Our minds prefer working with tangibles (numbers) over abstracts (variables). 2 is often a simple and easy number to plug-in.

(3) SAT Reading Strategy: Watch Out For Extreme Language – Extreme answer choices are typically incorrect on SAT Reading. Test question writers must be able to defend why correct answers are correct. Answer choices with milder language are easier to defend than answer choices with extreme language. Here are some examples of extreme language:

-all
-always
-completely
-entirely
-every
-everyday
-everyone
-everything
-never
-none
-only
-throughout history
-throughout the ages
-totally
-unique

Answer choices that include the words and phrases above are generally incorrect on the SAT.

(4) SAT Writing Strategy: Watch Out For 99% Wrong Words & Phrases – There are certain words and phrases that are almost always (99% of the time) incorrect on the SAT grammar section, including:

-being
-for the reason
-is because
-is the reason why
-is why

The above are typically incorrect because they create passive voice or redundancy issues.

(5) SAT Essay Strategy – CREW SAID: Although the essay section is technically optional, many competitive colleges will require students to submit their New SAT score with the essay. The New SAT requires students to write an analysis essay based on an argumentative passage that they read. To have a competitive advantage over other students on the SAT Essay, use the acronym CREW SAID to recall eight common argumentative tools that authors use to support their arguments. By analyzing the SAT Essay passage using CREW SAID, you take a lot of the guesswork out of determining how the author will build his or her argument on test-day.

C – Contrast – when an author highlights differences between two items
R – Repercussions – when an author points out the far-reaching consequences of his/her argument
E – Emotion – when an author attempts to make an emotional appeal to the reader
W – Word Choice – when an author purposefully uses certain language in order to build his or her argument

S – Similarity – when an author highlights similarities between two items
A – Authority – when an author cites an expert or influencer to add clout to his or argument
I – Imagery – when an author paints a picture using words
D – Data – when an author uses statistics or numerical evidence

The above represents just 5 of the 100 strategies that we teach in our New SAT courses at Prep Expert (formerly 2400 Expert). You can also join my 6-week Online SAT Class that starts this weekend to learn 95 more strategies by enrolling here.

$210 Off Coupon Code, use COLLEGEGOLFCAMPS

Shaan Patel is the founder of Prep Expert Test Preparation (formerly 2400 Expert), a #1 bestselling SAT prep author, an MD/MBA student at Yale and USC, and winner of an investment deal with billionaire Mark Cuban on ABC’s Shark Tank. He raised his own SAT score from average to perfect and teaches students his methods in an online SAT prep class.

5 More SAT Prep Tips For The 2016, Redesigned New SAT

5 More SAT Prep Tips For The 2016, Redesigned New SAT

Shaan Patel – 2400 Expert

There is a lot of trepidation around the New SAT. However, I have good news for you. The New SAT is easier than ever to prepare for. Here are 5 tips to help you prepare. You can also join my 6-week Online SAT Class that starts this weekend to learn 95 more strategies by enrolling here.

(1) SAT General Strategy – Follow the 1,000 Question Rule: To really excel, you should practice with 1,000 SAT questions. You should also review those 1,000 SAT questions. Just as critical as the practice itself is understanding why you got certain questions incorrect and what you can do next time to make sure you don’t get similar problems incorrect. The College Board only has a limited number of concepts and question types it can ask you on the SAT. If you practice and review 1,000 questions, you will be sufficiently prepared for test day.

(2) SAT Math Strategy: SAT – Substitute Abstract (with) Tangibles – To avoid doing algebra on the SAT, create your own numbers (tangibles) to plug in for variables (abstracts). This strategy is applicable to algebra, geometry, proportions, etc. Our minds prefer working with tangibles (numbers) over abstracts (variables). 2 is often a simple and easy number to plug-in.

(3) SAT Reading Strategy: Watch Out For Extreme Language – Extreme answer choices are typically incorrect on SAT Reading. Test question writers must be able to defend why correct answers are correct. Answer choices with milder language are easier to defend than answer choices with extreme language. Here are some examples of extreme language:

-all
-always
-completely
-entirely
-every
-everyday
-everyone
-everything
-never
-none
-only
-throughout history
-throughout the ages
-totally
-unique

Answer choices that include the words and phrases above are generally incorrect on the SAT.

(4) SAT Writing Strategy: Watch Out For 99% Wrong Words & Phrases – There are certain words and phrases that are almost always (99% of the time) incorrect on the SAT grammar section, including:

-being
-for the reason
-is because
-is the reason why
-is why

The above are typically incorrect because they create passive voice or redundancy issues.

(5) SAT Essay Strategy – CREW SAID: Although the essay section is technically optional, many competitive colleges will require students to submit their New SAT score with the essay. The New SAT requires students to write an analysis essay based on an argumentative passage that they read. To have a competitive advantage over other students on the SAT Essay, use the acronym CREW SAID to recall eight common argumentative tools that authors use to support their arguments. By analyzing the SAT Essay passage using CREW SAID, you take a lot of the guesswork out of determining how the author will build his or her argument on test-day.

C – Contrast – when an author highlights differences between two items
R – Repercussions – when an author points out the far-reaching consequences of his/her argument
E – Emotion – when an author attempts to make an emotional appeal to the reader
W – Word Choice – when an author purposefully uses certain language in order to build his or her argument

S – Similarity – when an author highlights similarities between two items
A – Authority – when an author cites an expert or influencer to add clout to his or argument
I – Imagery – when an author paints a picture using words
D – Data – when an author uses statistics or numerical evidence

The above represents just 5 of the 100 strategies that we teach in our New SAT courses at Prep Expert (formerly 2400 Expert). You can also join my 6-week Online SAT Class that starts this weekend to learn 95 more strategies by enrolling here.

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Shaan Patel is the founder of Prep Expert Test Preparation (formerly 2400 Expert), a #1 bestselling SAT prep author, an MD/MBA student at Yale and USC, and winner of an investment deal with billionaire Mark Cuban on ABC’s Shark Tank. He raised his own SAT score from average to perfect and teaches students his methods in an online SAT prep class.

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